Faculty Physical Phenomena

Physical Phenomena Named After Faculty

Note that this page is a work in progress. If you would like to add someone to this page, contact the webmaster with the name of the name of the physical phenomena and a short description. Send it to:


The Calogero-Sutherland Model

Dr. T. Bill Sutherland was a professor at the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Utah from 1971 to 2004.

The Calogero-Sutherland Model is now a major research area in theoretical physics and pure mathematics.
Learn more here.

A more in-depth look at this model is available in this book:

Calogero-Moser-Sutherland Models (CRM Series in Mathematical Physics).
Van Diejen, J. F., & Vinet, L. (Eds.). (2012).
Springer Publishing.

http://www.springer.com/us/book/9781461270430

 

 

The Fitch-Cronin Effect

Dr. Jim Cronin, a Nobel Laureate particle physicist and briefly a faculty member at the University of Utah, helped develop the Fitch-Cronin Effect, which clarifies the relationship between matter and antimatter produced by the Big Bang.

Learn more here.

 

 

 

 

The Keuffel Effect

Dr. Jack W. Keuffel was a professor, and pioneer in Cosmic Ray research at the University of Utah from 1960 to 1974.

Learn more about the Keuffel Effect here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Lieb-Schultz-Mattis Theorem

Dr. Dan Mattis was a professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Utah from 1980 until 2011. The Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem. It is a widely known and well cited (2,000+ citations) seminal result for one-dimensional spin models of quantum magnetism. It's higher dimensional extension has been proven in 2004 only, and is also considered a seminal achievement (this result belongs to Matt Hastings of Duke University).

Learn more here.

 

 

The Parker Spiral & Parker Wind Models

Dr. Eugene Parker, was a professor at the University of Utah in the 1950's, but moved to the University of Chicage in 1955. Among other honors and achievements, Dr. Parker developed the Parker Spiral & Parker Wind Models.

Learn more here.

 

 

 

 

The Price Theorem

Dr. Richard Price was at the University of Utah from 1971 to 2004, when he joined the Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy at the University of Texas Brownsville. In 2015 he joined the Physics Department at MIT and in 2017 became the Editor of the American Journal of Physics. Price's theorem, "Whatever can be radiated is radiated", states that perturbations of astrophysical objects are completely radiated away during the collapse to form a black hole.

Learn more here.

 

 

 

 


If you would like to add someone to this page, contact the webmaster with the name of the name of the physical phenomena and a short description. Send it to:

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