Commencement & Convocation Information 2016

From the Office of the Registrar

CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES!

University Commencement ceremony will be held on Thursday, May 5, 2016 at 6:30pm in the Jon M Huntsman Center (Map). Candidates for graduation in the summer 2015, fall 2015, spring 2016, or summer 2016 terms may attend.

Commencement is open to the public and free to attend. No tickets or RSVP required. This year's commencement speaker is work-life thought leader, Anne-Marie Slaughter. The University of Utah Board of Trustees announced four individuals selected to receive honorary doctorate degrees at commencement. For more information, please visit the Commencement Ceremony page. Those who are unable to attend commencement will be able to watch the live stream or posted video via the utah.edu website. For more information, please visit the Commencement Ceremony page."

For those of you attending or participating in graduation ceremonies this spring, here's some important information.

COMMENCEMENT

(this is the one for the entire campus where the VIPs speak)
Thursday, May 5, 2016
Huntsman Center (Map)

  • 5:00 pm - Graduates assemble in the Parking Terrace west of the Huntsman Center dressed in cap and gown
  • 5:30 pm - Guests should be seated
  • 5:45 pm - Procession begins
  • 6:30 pm - Commencement ceremony begins

CONVOCATION

(this is the one where your name is called and you walk across the stage)
College of Science (Click here for other colleges' date, time and location)
Friday, May 6, 2016
Kingsbury Hall (Map) with overflow seating in JFB 101 and JFB 103 (Map)
More info

  • 7:15 am - Graduates assemble on the west side of Kingsbury Hall (see the link above for additional details)
  • 7:45 am - Guests should be seated -
    (saving seats is not allowed - tell your family and friends they all need to arrive at the same time - once Kingsbury is full, guests will be directed to JFB for overflow seating and may view it on closed circuit projected onto the large screens in the lecture halls)
  • 8:00 am - Convocation ceremony begins
  • 9:30 am - College of Science Reception on Presidents Circle

WATCH IT LIVE

Convocation will also be streamed live online so forward these links to family and friends who want to view it, but can't attend:
On-demand streaming of the College of Science Convocation will be available here.
The live stream link will be available here.

PARKING & TRANSPORTATION

Campus parking lots may be used at no charge during commencement and convocation ceremonies. Please see the commencement parking map for parking locations as well as shuttle and TRAX stops. Additionally, since campus parking is limited, we encourage the use of UTA TRAX on these days. The use of TRAX while on campus is free both days, but fare is still required for any off campus travel.

Shuttle Services

As campus parking is limited, graduates and their guests are encouraged to use the free campus shuttle service to travel between commencement events. Shuttles run throughout campus and are scheduled every 10 minutes. Track the current location of any campus shuttle using the Live Shuttle Tracker.

Accessible Parking

For a map to all accessible parking options on campus, visit the campus map and select the "Accessible" option from the Map Features drop-down menu.

Construction Alerts

For a map with notifications regarding all parking lots effected by campus construction, view the campus map and select the "Construction" option from the Map Features drop-down menu.

Commuter Services

For more information about transportation and parking options, visit the Commuter Services website.

To learn more, please visit the Commencement Ceremony Parking & Transportation page.

More…

Frontiers of Science with Steven C. Wofsy

Thursday, April 7, 2016 @ 6:00 p.m. - Frontiers of Science with Steven C. Wofsy! "Greenhouse Gases: Current Trends and Implications" in room 220 of the Aline Wilmot Skaggs Building (ASB) on the U of U Campus!.

FRONTIERS OF SCIENCE

with Dr. Steven C. Wofsy,
Abbott Lawrence Rotch Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Chemistry at Harvard University

Greenhouse Gases: Current Trends and Implications

Date & Time: Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 6:00pm

Location: 220 Aline Skaggs Building at the University of Utah
View Map

Concentrations of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere have increased dramatically, starting in the 18th century, representing powerful drivers of global change and climate warming. In order assess future changes and design mitigation strategies, the emissions of these gases must be quantified, and the underlying biological, chemical, physical, and human processes must be understood. The relevant spatial scales span ecosystems, landscapes, regions, and continents, with temporal scales from seasonal to decadal, all very difficult to measure directly. This talk traces historical changes in atmospheric composition, showing the dramatic trends starting in the 1950s and continuing today. We then focus on the Arctic, a region with strong sensitivity to warming climate and vast stores of frozen or waterlogged organic carbon. We show recent results from the Carbon in the Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) and other regional measurements that challenge conventional ideas about climate-carbon feedbacks in this region, emphasizing the key roles of processes that occur out of sight--under the surface, after the growing season. We conclude with a comparison between emissions of CH4 and CO2 due to human activities versus the natural world, showing the astonishing transition of the human component from modest perturbation to overwhelming dominance, in recent human memory.

Frontiers of Science is free and open to the public. Please arrive early, as seating and parking will be limited. Click here to learn more about the Frontiers of Science lecture series.

More…

Science Night Live with Colleen Farmer

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 @ 5:30 p.m. - Science Night Live with Colleen Farmer! "Loopy Lungs: Do Reptiles Breathe Like Birds?" at Keys on Main (242 South Main Street, Salt Lake City, UT).

SCIENCE NIGHT LIVE

with Dr. Colleen Farmer,
Associate Professor of Biology at the University of Utah

Loopy Lungs: Do Reptiles Breathe Like Birds?

Date & Time: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 at 5:30pm (Lecture begins at 6:00 pm)

Location: Keys on Main (242 South Main Street)
View Map

Birds are among the most powerful of athletes, having an extraordinary, if loopy, set of lungs. Furthermore, birds can fly at altitudes that render resting mammals comatose. Studies of the anatomy of the bird lung date back to the work of Volcher Coiter in 1500s, and of the tolerance of birds and mammals to rarified air to the work of Robert Boyle in the 1600s. In spite of this long and venerable history of research, there is much about the bird lung and its capacity for gas exchange in rarefied air that remains shrouded in mystery. Recently, modern medical imaging methods and advances in computer science have been brought to bear on the study of lungs of the sister group to birds, the crocodilians, as well as studies of their cousins, lizards, and are revealing the evolutionary steps that gave rise to the bird lung as well as shedding light on lung structures in long extinct dinosaurs and their kin.

Science Night Live is free and open to the public. Please arrive early, as seating and parking will be limited. Click here to learn more about the Science Night Live lecture series.

More…

Pearl Sandick Receives Early Career Teaching Award


Pearl Sandick

Assistant Professor Pearl Sandick has received a 2016 Early Career Teaching Award. This award is given each year to only a few faculty members at the University of Utah for "distinction in teaching, demonstrated by activities that result in increased learning by students, such as the development of new methods or other curricular innovation."

More…

Science Employer Panel

Wednesday, February 24, 2016 @ 3:00 p.m. - Science Employer Panel in room 210 of the Aline Wilmot Skaggs Building (ASB) on the U of U Campus!

SCIENCE EMPLOYER PANEL

hosted by the College of Science

Date & Time: Wednesday, February 24, 2016 @ 3:00 pm (Panel begins at 3:00 pm, networking begins at 4:00 pm)

Location: Room 210, Aline Wilmot Skaggs Building (ASB)
View Map

The Science Employer Panel brings students and professionals together for an in-depth discussion of the job prospects and internship opportunities available to science graduates. Students get direct access to insider information about a variety of science industries, while panelists get a chance to meet their future employees and share about why their business is a great place to work. Connections made at the Science Employer Panel start new careers, and help drive Utah’s economic engine.

Panel: 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Panelists:

Orbital ATK
Green Fire Energy
Chemtech-Ford
ThermoFisher Sciencetific
IM Flash Technologies

Networking: 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Networking:

BioFire
Chevron
David Eccles School of Business

Science Employer Panel is free. Click here, or contact Paige Berg at (801) 587-8098, to learn more about the Science Employer Panel.

More…

Frontiers of Science with John Grotzinger

Thursday, February 18, 2016 @ 6:00 p.m. - Frontiers of Science with John Grotzinger! "Curiosity’s Mission to Gale Crater, Mars" in room 220 of the Aline Wilmot Skaggs Building (ASB) on the U of U Campus!

FRONTIERS OF SCIENCE

with Dr. John Grotzinger,
Professor of Geology, Divison of Geological and Planetary Science, Caltech

Curiosity’s Mission to Gale Crater, Mars

Date & Time: Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 6:00pm

Location: 220 Aline Skaggs Building at the University of Utah
View Map

The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, touched down on the surface of Mars on August 5, 2012. Curiosity was built to search and explore for habitable environments and has a lifetime of at least one Mars year (~23 months), and drive capability of at least 20 km. The MSL science payload can assess ancient habitability which requires the detection of former water, as well as a source of energy to fuel microbial metabolism, and key elements such carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, and phosphorous. The search for complex organic molecules is an additional goal and our general approach applies some of the practices that have functioned well in exploration for hydrocarbons on Earth. The selection of the Gale Crater exploration region was based on the recognition that it contained multiple and diverse objectives, ranked with different priorities, and thus increasing the chances of success that one of these might provide the correct combination of environmental factors to define a potentially habitable paleoenvironment. Another important factor in exploration risk reduction included mapping the landing ellipse ahead of landing so that no matter where the rover touched down, our first drive would take us in the direction of a science target deemed to have the greatest value as weighed against longer term objectives, and the risk of mobility failure. Within 8 months of landing we were able to confirm full mission success. This was based on the discovery of fine-grained sedimentary rocks, inferred to represent an ancient lake. These Fe-Mg-rich smectitic mudstones preserve evidence of an aqueous paleoenvironment that would have been suited to support a Martian biosphere founded on chemolithoautotrophy and characterized by neutral pH, low salinity, and variable redox states of both iron and sulfur species. The environment likely had a minimum duration of hundreds to tens of thousands of years. In the past year simple chlorobenzene and chloroalkane molecules were confirmed to exist within the mudstone. These results highlight the biological viability of fluvial-lacustrine environments in the ancient history of Mars and the value of robots in geologic exploration.

Frontiers of Science is free and open to the public. Please arrive early, as seating and parking will be limited. Click here to learn more about the Frontiers of Science lecture series.

More…

Follow Us

Support Us

Make A Difference

Outreach: The Department of Physics & Astronomy at the U

Community Outreach

Scholarships: The Department of Physics & Astronomy at the U

Academic Scholarships

General_Development: The Department of Physics & Astronomy at the U

Other Areas
of Support

 

Our Newest Program:

Crimson Laureate Society

Posters

Click to download full size.

The Department of Physics & Astronomy at the U

 

Science, it makes us all go

 

Even Our English Majors Study Physics

 

The Formula For The Perfect Pass

 

  • Department of Physics & Astronomy • 201 James Fletcher Bldg. 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830
  • PHONE 801-581-6901
  • Fax 801-581-4801
  • ©2017 The University of Utah