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Ipsita Saha and HIV Research

Ipsita Saha

Graduate student Ipsita Saha likes physics because it explains the small details of daily life—the science behind how a car works or the mechanics of opening a window. She also likes that physics allows scientists to visualize mathematical equations. During her studies, she harbored a secret desire to become an astronomer but eventually realized she was more interested in the ability of physics to answer intricate biological questions. When she came to the U for graduate studies, she joined a biophysics lab.

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U Physicists M. Vershinin and S. Saffarian Test Coronavirus Particles Against Temperature and Humidity

COVID-19 image

One of the biggest unknowns about the coronavirus is how changing seasons will affect its spread. Physicists from the University of Utah have received the university’s first COVID-19-related grant to tackle the question. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a Rapid Response Research (RAPID) grant to Michael Vershinin and Saveez Saffarian of the U’s Department of Physics & Astronomy to study the structure of the SARS-COV-2, the coronavirus strain at the center of the pandemic.

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update for Spring Semester

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Update: Due to the earthquake and aftershocks on March 18, all online classes are canceled until March 19. The University of Utah will shift to all-online instruction beginning March 19 for the rest of spring semester, including finals.

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Discovery Points to Origin of Mysterious Ultraviolet Radiation

Photo of Lyman-Alpha Emissions

Billions of lightyears away, gigantic clouds of hydrogen gas produce a special kind of radiation, a type of ultraviolet light known as Lyman-alpha emissions. The enormous clouds emitting the light are Lyman-alpha blobs (LABs). LABs are several times larger than our Milky Way galaxy, yet were only discovered 20 years ago. An extremely powerful energy source is necessary to produce this radiation—think the energy output equivalent of billions of our sun—but scientists debate what that energy source could be.

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Tino Nyawelo Receives Community Engaged Teaching Award

Tino Nyawelo in REFUGES Classroom

The University Teaching Committee has selected Tino Nyawelo, associate professor (lecturer) in Physics & Astronomy, to receive the Community Engaged Teaching and Scholarship Award (CES) for 2020. The CES Award recognizes and rewards a University of Utah faculty member of any rank for high quality work that integrates teaching, research, and community engagement.

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Last Updated: 7/10/19