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New Phenomenon Discovered that Fixes a Common Problem in Lasers: Wavelength Splitting

Lasers: Wavelength Splitting

A team led by University of Utah physicists has discovered how to fix a major problem that occurs in lasers made from a new type of material called quantum dots. The never-before-seen phenomenon will be important for an emerging field of photonics research, including one day making micro-chips that code information using light instead of electrons. The study published on Feb. 4, 2019, in the journal Nature Communications. Lasers are devices...

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U Physics Student Awarded Prestigious Churchill Scholarship

Photo of Churchill Scholar Cameron Owen

Cameron Owen of Boise, Idaho, a senior majoring in physics and chemistry and minoring in mathematics, has received the prestigious Churchill Scholarship to study at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. He is one of only 15 students nationally to receive the award this year and is the fourth consecutive Churchill Scholar from the U.

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U Develops First Dark Sky Studies Minor in the U.S.

Dark Sky

The W. M. Keck Foundation has awarded $250,000 to the University of Utah to establish a new undergraduate minor in dark sky studies, the first of its kind in the United States. Dark sky studies is an emerging field that explores the impacts of artificial light at night and the loss of our night skies through a broad range of disciplines. Housed in the College of Architecture + Planning, the minor is open to all students across the university who will explore issues through the lens of science, including in public health, urban planning, engineering, and the humanities, from religion to history and philosophy.

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Spintronics "Miracle Material" Put to the Test

Valy Vardeny

In 2017, University of Utah physicist Valy Vardeny called perovskite a “miracle material” for an emerging field of next-generation electronics, called spintronics, and he’s standing by that assertion. In a paper published today in Nature Communications, Vardeny, along with Jingying Wang, Dali Sun (now at North Carolina State University), and colleagues present two devices built using perovskite to demonstrate the material’s potential in spintronic systems. Its properties, Vardeny says, bring the dream of a spintronic transistor one step closer to reality.

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Last Updated: 1/18/19