PHYS 3740: Introduction to Relativity & Quantum Mechanics (Modern Physics)

Student Presentation Schedule:

Presentations will be given on Tuesdays during class. We will have at least 3 presentations each Tuesday unless noted otherwise.

Here is a copy of the gradesheet I'll fill out and hand back to everyone after their presentation. It provides some guidance and a grading rubric.

Week: TUES Presentation Topics Presenters
1: AUG 23 None  
2: AUG 31 None  
3: SEP 6 Measuring the speed of light:
1) Galileo: lamps and Jupiter’s moons
2) Cassini, Roemer and Picard: Jupiter’s moons
3) James Bradley: stellar aberration
4) Fizeau: spinning mirror
1) Joshua Wolfe
2) Jon Drake
3)
4) Thomas Woodland
4: SEP 13 Consequences of relativity:
1) Michelson-Morley: interferometer experiment
2) Rossi and Hall: muon experiment
3) Hafele and Keating: clocks on airliners
4) Global positioning system (GPS)
1) Andrew Clark
2) Chad Lake
3) Kyle Arslanian
4) Andrew Dilts
5: SEP 20 Other topics in relativity:
1) Henri Poincare’s contribution
2) Hubble’s Law: an expanding universe
3) Methods to determine longitude at sea
1) Mustafa Hussain
2) Vincent Beaver
3) Gavin Kindall
6: SEP 27 Midterm Exam #1  
7: OCT 4 Quantization of light:
1) Max Planck and blackbody radiation
2) Einstein and the Photoelectric effect
3) William Roentgen and the production of x-rays
4) Arthur Compton and Compton Scattering
1)
2)
3)
4)
OCT 10 - 14 Fall Break - No Class
8: OCT 18 CANCELLED CANCELLED
9: OCT 25 Quantization of matter:
1) The twin paradox
2) Fraunhofer and solar spectroscopy
3) Amedeo Avogadro’s hypothesis
4) Balmer, Lyman, and Rydberg spectra of hydrogen
5) Brown and Einstein - Brownian motion
1) John Shifflet
2) Ryan Tibbitts
3) Liz Richey
4)
5) Garrett Stevens
10: NOV 1 Quantization of charge:
1) GZK cutoff: photon + proton collisions
2) Pieter Zeeman’s magnetic splitting experiments
3) JJ Thomson - charge-to-mass ratio of an electron
4) Michael Faraday's Electrolysis Experiments
1) Matt Baird
2) Brady Thompson
3) Dieter Bevans
4) Mark Feil
11: NOV 8 Matter behaving as waves:
1) Davisson-Germer Experiment
2) IBM and quantum corrals
1)
2)
12: NOV 15 Midterm Exam #2  
13: NOV 22 Basic concepts in quantum mechanics:
1) Heisenberg and the Uncertainty Principle
2) Fluorescence and electron microscopy
3) Robert Millikan’s oil drop experiment
4)
1) Min-A Cho
2) Giancarlo Aguirre
3) Derek Strasters
4)
14: NOV 29 Other great discoveries:
1) Rutherford Scattering - discovery of the nucleus
2) Wolfgang Pauli - the Pauli Exclusion Principle
3) de Broglie hypothesis: matter waves
4) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and MRI
1) Max Llamozas
2) Kayla Martindale
3) Renaldo Jones
4) Eric Bennion
15: DEC 6 Applications of quantum mechanics:
1)
2)
3)
4)
1)
2)
3)
4)

Presentation Guidelines:

General Information:
1) Schedule: Presentations will be given on Tuesdays during class.
2) Take it seriously: Worth 5% of your grade.
3) Default mode of presentation: 10-minute discussion led by presenter using PowerPoint slides (or similar) for a visual aid.
4) Collaboration: Group presentations are encouraged.
5) Duration: N ◊ 10-minutes, where N is the number of students involved.
6) Bonus points for extra creativity: you can make up a skit, a poem, a dance, a song, a visual display, etc. Have fun but donít compromise content!

Expectations:
1) Physics: Your presentation should summarize the relevant physics involved in the topic, and the impact on the development of physics.
2) History: Most of the topics deal with an important experiment or sequence of events that strongly influenced the development of a particular aspect of Modern Physics. I expect you to put your topic in proper perspective by discussing the historical context.
3) Drama: History is more fun and memorable if you emphasize the dramatic aspects. As an example (not covered in this class), Rosalind Franklin, a Physicist, played a key role in the discovery of the structure of DNA. She was omitted from the Nobel Prize (Watson and Crick), however, both because of arguably unethical behavior on the part of her collaborator, and because she died before the prize was awarded (Nobel Prizes cannot be given post-mortem).

Grading:
1) Point breakdown: I will grade on a 10-point scale, which will turn into percentage points for your final course grade. Although the grading rubric will depend somewhat on the topic, hereís a general guide:
  • Physics - 4
  • Historical context - 3
  • Quality of presentation - 2
  • Dramatic elements - 1
2) Bonus points for creativity: Up to 3 bonus points are available for creativity. These will be given on a sliding scale depending on whether the presentation exhibits:
  • Some but minimal creative elements - 1
  • Clear creativity - 2
  • Outstanding creativity - 3

Prof. Jordan Gerton | James Fletcher Building | Room 314 | 115 South 1400 East | Salt Lake City, UT | 84112
Office: +1-801-585-0068 | Email: jgertonphysics.utah.edu