My Honey Bee Hive Logbook

I am just getting into beekeeping. I am starting with two hives . I will keep this page as my hive logbook. The most recent entries will be at the top. I will try to keep it up to date in both French and English so that friends and family can keep an eye on what is going on in my backyard. 


Questions, suggestions...

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Le Carnet de Bord de mes Ruches

Je me lance dans l'apiculture. Je commence avec deux ruches. Cette page me servira de carnet de bord. Les entrées les plus récentes seront en haut de la page. Je m'efforcerai de la tenir à jour en Français* et en Anglais afin que famille et copains puissent suivre dans le détail ce qui se passe dans notre jardin. 
* Cependant je me rends compte que je ne connais pas le vocabulaire technique en Français. Si vous pouvez corriger mes fautes, contactez moi...



September 27th 2009
I gave close to a gallon of syrup to each hive

Septembert 13th 2009
Today I gave a second dose of teramicyn to all three hives and als gave apistan to the south west hive. I do not see how this one cn make it. Although it has some brood it has not stock of honey. The good thing is that wax moths are apparently gone. I did not inspect the other hives as a storm is building up. I need to prepare some more syrup. I only had half a gallon to share between the three hives.

August 30th 2009
Today I gave apistan to each hive except the south west one with only one deep. I gave the three hives a first dose of teramicyn and installed the feeders with close to a gallon of syrup in each.

August th 2009
Today we took the honey out of the hives. Many frames were not capped yet. It ent really quick. We got two and a half five gallon buckets of honey. We have to get organized to sale our honey around.

August 9th 2009
We have been traveling for the last close to three weeks. The top box of the front hive does not contain much. The bees have started drawing combs. The second box is filling up with honey but is not capped yet. Boxed bellow that are at least partilly capped. In the central hive the two top boxes are feeling up with honey but care not capped yet. Lower boxes are capped. I think we will harvest during the weekend of August 29-30. The south hive was infested with wax moth but also counted nice regions of brood. I removed the worst frames and reduced the frame to a single box. I removed the slatted rack and scrapped the bottom board. I'll post pictureslater.

July 19th 2009
I added a super on each of the front and central hives and combined the south and north hives together. I placed a sheet of news paper on top of the south hive and placed the north hive on top.

July 10th 2009
The south hive has shown an increase in activity at the entrance over the last couple of weeks. When I opened today, I saw ants transporting eggs around on the inner cover. I did not see more ants in the rest of the hive but I found a few frames one third covered with brood. I noticed a few pupa which had not been capped. I thought that maybe the population was too weak to properly take care of the brood. The north hive is now under atack of wax moth so I removed the super and queen excluder and shook all the bees from the upper deep to freeze the frames. So that hive is now one box tall like the south one. I should probably merge them. I placed the supers I removed from the north hive on top of the front and central hives where I could see the honey was getting capped in the top shallow.

June 28th 2009
The north hive is confirmed as drone laying. The central and front hive are looking good.

June 21st 2009
I did not open the south hive. The north hive looks like it went into drone laying mode. The central and front hives are looking ok but they are not working fast.

June 6th 2009
The south hive is not in a good shape. There was not one single bee in the lower brood box and I saw a few wax moths so I removed the lower box to make the bee space smaller. On the north hive, I placed a queen excluder and two shallow supers. On the middle hive I placed a queen excluder and two shallow supers as well. On the front hive I added one shallow super as the top one was getting close to being fully occupied.

May 30th 2009
This evening, Danielle Downey stopped by and we gave a look at the two back hives. In the north hive we saw eggs. In the south hive, she saw eggs but I did not. It was late and getting dark.

May 25th 2009
I checked the two back hives and did not see any trace of a queen. I do not know wat I will do. The front hive looks good, I added two shallow supers. The middle hive has not progressed much in the top brood box and I did not do anything.

May 12th 2009
I dedided to have a peek again today. In the south hive, no signs of an active queen. There are still a few eggs on the frame I gave them last time but it is not my impression they will start a queen. I do not know what to do. In the north hive, no signs of an active queen either. I gave it a frame of eggs from the middle hive (the one with the swarm). The middle hive is booming. In the front hive, I did not see any signs of an active queen either so I placed a frame of eggs from the middle hive. This is my worst spring sofar with bees. I think I am going to not open the hives for 3 to 4 weeks to see if they recover. It is clear we will not get much honey this year.

May 10th 2009
In the front hive I could still not see any sign of a queen. I still decided to install a queen excluder and a shallow super. On the middle hive (with the swarm) I placed a second deep hive body with plastic foundations. In both the north and south hive, the queens have been released but I could not see any eggs yet. In the north hive, I saw a couple of supercedure cells with in one of the the larva visible.

May 7th 2009
Nora went to buy two queens and we installed them this evening. In the drone layer hive (south hive) I placed a frame of eggs from the swarm hive.

May 6th 2009
This morning, I stayed home to remove the queens from my north and south hive. I could not find any of them. In the south hive I saw some dead brood and I got worried so I wrote to Danielle Downey (ddowney-AT-utah.gov) who is the State of Utah apiarist so see if she would have a look. She accepted to stop by this afternoon and we met at 16:00 to check the hives. The south hive turns out to have a drone layer. I need to install a queen. The south hive seems to not hav had a queen for the last three days. I might have killed it during my last visit. The queen was not in a good shape anyway. I should install a queen there as well. Danielle suggested I could also combine my swarm hive with one of the weak hives. I am not sure what I will do. We checked the swarm hive and saw a lot of eggs. Daielle was not surprized to see so many eggs and no larvae. The front hive does not have a queen yet but it is strong and Danielle suggested I wait 10 days not doing anything and it will become queen right.

May 3th 2009
In the north and south hive I could not see much brood at all and in the south hive I saw some weird dead brood but no sign of fould brood. The middle hive with the swarm was surprizing with frames full of eggs, frames full of capped brood but no larvae. The front hive does not have much brood. A storm was moving in and I got stung something like ten times through my clothes.

April 25th 2009
It is rainy today and I can not check on the hives in which there were no eggs last week.

April 21th 2009
I went to Jone's bee company to get frames and an entrance feeder. The kids id put the frames together while I made a bottom board as they did not have any available at Jone's. We inspected the hives. The south and north hive do not have any egg. In the south hive we have seen very few larvae, all of them more than 5 days old. The front hive on the other hand had a lot of brood but no eggs. We have seen a queen cell in the upper deep. Unfortunately we broke it and saw the queen pupa. We decided to not inspect the frames of the lower deep. It must be the front hive which swarmed. We prepare a stand for the hive with the swarm. Then in the late after noon when there was less activity at the entrance, we installed frames in the new hive and moved the shallow, deep and covers in one piece to the stand and bottom board between the front and the south and north hives. I called Jone's regading the two hives with no eggs. They said we should wait a week to decide if we need to introduce new queens.

April 20th 2009
Today I gave a little of the syrup I had left to each hive. We then spent the day at a friend's place where ha was starting his first hive. When we came back our neighbor, George, pointed at a swarm that was settled in one of his pear tree. Very quickly we prepared a hive. I used a plank and 3 pieces of wood to form a bottom board and placed a shallow super on top with frames with honey from last year. Then on top I had a deep. I found a card box went to George pear tree shook the branch to get most of the bees in the box and then dumped the bees in the hive which we closed with an inner cover and outer cover. We will make things better tomorrow. It is unclear if it is one of our hives that produced the swarm. I do not see much change in any of them but it is true we had noticed the front hive was very busy.

April 6th 2009
The weather improved yeaterday after a week of really bad cold humid weather. Thisevening, I notice a few (~6) larvae have been dumped in front of the south hive. A few dead bees are on the bottom board of the north hive. Bees were ventilating at the entrace of the front hive.

March 29th 2009
Today I gave a second treatment of tetracycline and gave a gallon of syrup to each hive.

March 24th 2009
To day I swapped top and bottom deep boxes. I gave all thress hives two apistan strip and their first treatment of tetracycline. I did not inspect the frames. The south and north hives had not more syrup in the feeder. I gave a third of a gallon each. The front hive had many dead bees in the feeder. It also have a lot of honey left and the population seems a little weak but I could see eggs right away. I also noticed a number of varoa mites on drone pupae. I removed the feeder to clean it. I will place it back later. All three hives had fairly clean bottom boards with very few dead bees.

March 10th 2009
Today was nice and I removed the inner cover to replace them with feeders. I shared a couple gallons of syrup between the thee hives. I did not notice anythig particular. The front and northern hives have some signs of diarhea. The northern hive is the one in which there was the most humidity and is also the one which has the stronges signs of diarhea.

September 24th 2008
Today I gave close to one gallon of syrup to each hive.

September 14th 2008
Today I gave a second dose of tetracycline and a little syrup to each hive.

August 30st 2008
To day we rinced the capping wax in the uncapping tank and melted it in a double boil.

August 30st 2008
I removed the last super from all three hives. Only the front one had it full of capped honey. The others had not much, especially the south one in which there was hardly nothing. We extracted the honey in the evening and got a very dark, very strong honey. Looked at the hives and found a lot of brood in the top boxes of the south and north hives. In the north hive I have seen a queen cell. I did not remove it. In the front hive there was hardly any brood in the upper box. I did not look at the lower box. The population is very strong. There are much fewer drones in all three hive than I remember from the previous years. Also I did not notice any sign of varoa mites. I gave apistan and tetracycline to each hive. In the feeders which I found empty I added one gallon of syrup.

August 16th 2008
Yesterday, I removed all supers except one on each hive. To day we extracted. We go a lot of visitors who helped and got a jar of honey. It is difficult to tell how much we got but I have the impression we collected more honey than last year.

August 3rd 2008
I checked the hives. The two in the back have not made much progress on the super I gave them two weeks ago. The Noth hive has constructed nice combs that are just starting to fill up. Ths south hive has started combs. The front hive has filled up the top super and I decided to add another one.

July 19th 2008
The bees have been doing very well while we were away. The three supers of each hive are packed with capped honey and it was really time to give them more space so I installed one super on each. The front hive is very strong. I wonder if they are doing so well with honey production because Iam not bothering them or if it has to do with the queen excluders. The other years, the queen would have started moving up by this time, taking space which would have other wise been for honey.

June 8th 2008
As we are leaving for a little more than a month, I removed the feeder from both the south and north hives and added three supers on each. Both have brrod in the upper deep. In the north hive, on the north hive, on the first frame I took out, I saw the queen with her head in a queen cup. I am not sure what this means if anything. On the front hive I added one super. I hope the bees will be ok dealing with all that space made available so quickly. On the other hand, in the front hive, in the second super I found frames that were close to being full with honey.

May 31st 2008
I looked at the three hives with Stephane Vincent. The South and north hives are still producing burr combs but not as much as last time I checked. The front hive has done a lot of progress and I removed the feeder and added two supers. I gave half a gallon of syrup to both the south and north hives. I will remove the feeders and place supers on those as well next week as we are leaving for a month.

May 17th 2008
I opened the hives to day to check everything. Not much progress was don in the upper hive bodies. The bees tend to construct burr combs at right angle for the frames in all three hive.

May 11th 2008
Today I gave one gallon of syrup to each hive. I did not inspect the bees. For the front hive, I noticed they were not using the syrup at all so I decided to clean the feeder and replace it with fresh syrup. There might have been something wrong with what was in there. I remove all the entrance reducers.

May 4th 2008
With Michel we checked the hives. We have seen larvaes and caped brood in all three. We searched the queen in the front hive and were lucky enough to find it. There are not too many bees yet. We added a quarter of syrup to the south hive and the north hive. The front hive had plenty of syrup left.

April 27th 2008
With Julien, we check all three hives. We have seen eggs in all and larvae in the fromt hive and in the north hive. The south hive seems to be starting slower.

April 19th 2008
This morning I went to pick up three packages of bees. The last hive (the front one) finally died in early spring with an incredible case of diarrhea. The two others had died earlier in the fall. Brian came over and we installed the bees using the same method as last time: place the queen cage between two frames with a plug of marshmallow then place the bee package upside down over the queen. On the next day I removed the empty bee packages and placed the frames in the upped deep hive box. I gave one gallon of syrup to each hive.

November 4th 2007
The south hive looks the same as last week. The syrup has not been used at all. I removed the apistan. Next week I might remove the top box so they have less space to deal with. The front hive looks good and the feeder was empty so I gave it half a gallon of syrup. The north hive looks ok but the syrup has not been used much.

October 28th 2007
The front hive looks really good. The north hive looks slow but still ok eventhough it has a lot of condensatio. The south hive is dying. There are very few bees, very little honey and polen, no brood, a few larvae and dead bees that never fully made it out of their cell. I do not know what is going on but I think it does not have one chance to make it.I gave syrup to all three hives, a treatment of teramicine and I removed the apistan from the front and north hive. I placed an entrance reducer to the smallest position on the south hive.

September 30th 2007
Yesterday it was cold and raining so I could not do anything. Today it is better but I am leaving at noon so I had to open the hives when it was still a little cold. I started by giving the north hive a dose of tetracycline and a gallon of syrup. Then I worked on the front hive. Removing the feeder was really hard, I had to use by hive tool between the bottom of the feeder and the frames to unglue them one by one. Once it was done, I gave tetracycline and syrup to that hive. Then I went to the south hive and removed all the frames from the super. There is quite a lot of honey in there, most uncapped. I then placed apistan strips in the bottom box, tetracycline on top of the upper frames and a gallon of syrup. I placed entrance reducers in front of each hive.

September 28th 2007
The feeder of the front hive is empty. All the plastic frames in the upper box are glued to the feeder. I will fight with that tomorrow. Today I was just having a quick peek. The feeder of the north hive showed a lot of condensation, it is made of plastic. Plastic is just bad in hives I think. I checked a few frames and they look. I looked at the south hive and there is no more brood in the super so I will be able to remove it tomorrow. This evening I have to prepare syrup.

September 6th 2007
I removed all the boxes from which we had extracted honey. I took all the frames I found with brood in the super I left on the northern hive and put them in the super I left on the southern hive. I placed apistan strips in the front and north hive and I gave these two hives their first teramicine treatment. I also gave the front and the north hive a galon of syrup each. For the southern hive, I'll wait for the brood in the super to be born so I can take the super away before treatment.

September 1st 2007
I placed all the boxes back on the hives. All the brood in the uper I placed back on the south and north hive still has to come out.

August 28th 2007
That has been a long time with no entries in this log book. We have been away to mexico for a while and bee-wise,the summer, after a complicated beginning has been uneventful. Two weeks ago I added a third super on to of the front hive. The other two hives had not been making much progress on the last super I gave them. We have extracted the honey from the three hive last weekend (August 25-26) and all in all we estimated we got 200 pounds of honey (more than three 5 gallon buckets). the first supers of the north and south hives contained some brood so I assembled the brood frames in each hive and place them in one super box on each hive. I completed the remaining space with empty frames. Next year I will use queen excluders on each hive. The extraction went well, many people came over to help. Filtering at the same time we extract is not efficient because the sieve creates a bottle neck in the process. The best is to let the unfiltered honey in a bucket for a few hours. This gives time to most of the wax to migrate to the top and then the filtering is much easier. I need to put the boxes back on the hives for a few days and then start treatments and feeding.

June 13th 2007
I added a second super on the front hive. The south hive has larvae developing. I think it really swarmed. It is interesting no one noticed the swarm. I did not check the northern hive again.

June 10th 2007
The front hive is working on its super. There are nice frames of brood. The south hive is weird. The are no larvae in the two deep hive boxes. The first shallow however containes a lot of eggs. I carefully checked and have not seen more than one egg per cell. It might be we really got a swarm and the new queen just started laying eggs, for some reason in the first shallow. I don't know. In the north hive, the new queen is working. There are brood frames, not very compact but still brood frames. When pulling up a frame I broke a few cells containing larvae and on one of them I could clearly see a varoa. No surprise. The bees have started drawing combs in the upper shallow.

June 5th 2007
The front hive seems almost fully occupied so I removed the feeder and aded a shallow super and an inner cover. The south hive does not seems very active and I have the impression there are not that many bees. Did I get a swarm? I could not look deep in the hive as the weather was stormy and I wanted to go back to work. The North hive is very active. All the frames from the upper shallow super are full so I added one more with celrite fundation that need combs to be drawn.

May 26th 2007
I removed the cork plug of the queen's cage and replaced it with a marsh mallow.

May 25th 2007
I added one gallon of syrup to the front hive. The south hive is not doing much progress. It has several queen cells at the bottom of the frames in the upper deep. I deceided not to remove them. I got a queen for the north hive. It looks small and black and I am not sure I got an italian. I installed it in its cage with a wooden cork between two frames of the bottom deep. I added a shallow super on the top of the north hive as it seems the bees have been moving a lot of honey up in the hive.

May 20th 2007
The front hive is going well as well as the south hive. The north hive still does not have a queen. The queen cells I had seen last time are now empty and so it is possible one of them is mating outside. The two deep hive bodies are packed with honey, they are very difficult to move now. Even if I introduce a queen now, I am not sure where she could lay eggs. I'll have to talk with Jones Bee Company people for advice. I have added one shallow on both the north and the south hives.

May 11th 2007
The front hive goes well, there aer really nice frames of brood. I added the second deep hive body and poured one gallon of syrup in the feeder which was dry. The south hive looks good too although I would say there is not a lot of brood. The might just reflect the fact it is a second season for that queen. I added one shaloow super as the one in place is getting quite full. The north hive does not have queen. I might have killed her during my last visit. I have seen four queen cells in the middle of frames from the bottom box. I think the queen was still alive at my last visit bacause the stage of development of the queen cells I have seen suggest they were started from eggs at least nine days ago but no more than 16 days ago (it takes 15 days to make a queen). The queen cells I have seen 12 days ago were 9 days olad at least as well and there were youing larvae. So that hive started producing queens not because it did not have one. Now the bees are trying to produce a queen because they do not have one. Tomorrow, I'll see if I can get one from Jone's bee company.

May 6th 2007
It was cold this weekend so I did not check the hives. I just added one gallon of syrup in the front hive.

April 30th 2007
The front hive looks good. About half of the frames are well occupied now. The feeder was dry. I added a gallon of syrup. The bees are still working on the protein patty. The south hive looks good to. I removed the apistan and the feeder and I added one super today. I also removed the entrance reducer. The north hive has not made much progress on its second super. At the bottom of the frames in the upper deep, I found many queen cells. Most of them were containing queens at various stages of development. Several queen cells were empty. I removed all of them in hope to prevent swarming if this is what it is about. I have seen young larvae so there is a queen. I removed the entrance reducer.

April 22nd 2007
The weather has been relatively cold and grey all weekend so it was a short visit. The front hive seems to be doing well. The feeder was dry and they are consuming the patty. I did not check any frame out but I can see they are drawing combs nicely inthere. The south hive still seems weak. When I opened I found a cocoon of wax moth so I though I would check a few frames. I have not seen any traces of wax moth but I probably need a better look next week when the weather will have improved. There are nice brood frame and the bees seem to be more numerous than last week. There was a little syrup left and I added some. I only lifted the inner cover of the north hive. I did not really check the frames but I could see the bees are drawing combs.

April 15th 2007
This morning we went snorkling at seabase in Grantsville. We got surrounded by fish in a way reminding of a swarm of bees. A really interesting place. In the SaltLake Tribune we found the article about bee day but we did not get our picture in the paper. In the afternoon, we checked on the front hive. The bees box was empty and the queen had been released. I removed everything. It was not possible to place the feeder directly on top because of the paty. So I placed the paty on one side of the feeder and in the other side of the feeder I poured close to a gallon of syrup. Then we checked the south hive and it looks better. The feeder was dry. We have seen nice combs of brood in the lower box. I poured close to a gallon of syrup in the feeder. The north hive is still booming. So much I decided to add one shallow. I used one of my new ones with plastic frames. I do not like the way hty feel but I think it will be good for the bees and that will give them something to work on. I did not check the bottom box.

April 14th 2007
This morning we went to Jones' bees to get the bees. Dave Jones told me about a better method to introduce the bees to the hive. We were pictured and interviewed by journalists from the SaltLake Tribune. I installed the queen in her cage between to frames after having plugged her cage with a little suger and a drop of water. Next to the queen, on the top bars I placed the can of syrup and a patie. Then, I placed the bees box on the top bars with the opening around the queen cage. It was really quick. Soon after closing the hive we could see bees flying in and out of the hive. The three hives look great!

April 7th 2007
We checked both hives with Oscar. The south hive still looks weak but ok. We added syrup and gave a tetracycline treatment. The north hive is packed. There are quite a few drones and dron cells. The boxes are so heavy they were hard to move around. I decided to remove the feeder, the apistan and add a shallow to give the bees more space. .

April 1st 2007
Today I painted the two hive bodies I had taken away from the hives. At times, the activity at the entrance of the south hive was almost as intense as at the north hive.

March 31st 2007
After the last visit the weather became colder and we even got some snow so I could not open until today. I gave the north hive a second tetracycline treatment and a quarter of syrup as the feeder was dry. In the south hive the feeder was just as last week and the bees almost did not touch the tetracycline. I went look in the bottom box right away to select a brood frame so bring to Jone's bee company to ask for advice. The frames were looking much nicer. I still found one frame with decaying dead pupa and took that one. At Jone's bee they said it did not look like any disease but that instead I probably had lost brood to cold with not enough bees to keep the brood warm. Good news! I got protein patties to give that hive a boost. In the afternoon I returned the frame to the hive and gave that hive one patty.

March 25th 2007
Today I check both hives again. I wanted to give them a first treatment of tetracycline and feed them syrup. I also wanted to replace the upper box by new ones as I notices a lot of paint is peeling off. Every thing went fine with the north hive. In the south hive, it was going well until I noticed two uncapped celle containing dead pupa. I extracted the dead pupa with a match. The were black and watery. I then poked a few capped cells and found several that were containing mud. Bringing my nose close to these cells I could smell an odor of decomposition. I got worried by foul brood but the remains of dead pupa were not stringy. I did every thing I had planned to do anyway.

March 18th 2007
Today I checked both hives. I cleaned the bottom boards. There were a lot of dead bees in the southern hive but both hives look good. The northern hive has a very strong population. I have seen brood in both and in the northern hive, I have seen the queen. Since as expected the brood was in the upper part of the hives, I swaped the bottom and top box of both. I gave both hives some syrup left over from last fall and I instraled apistan strips.

February 24th 2007
This morning I called Jone's bee company to order a package of bees so we can start a new hive. From listening at the two hives I have the impression they will be ok. So one package should be enough. The we went to get some primer and paint and we started painting the new hive.

February 9th 2007
From time to time I stop by at the hives and listen to the side of the boxes. Every thing seems well despite the cold weather we have had. There are a few dead bees in front of the south hive. In the spring I will start a third hive. I just received two deeps, two shallows with all the frames, the base, bottom board and covers for $170 from Mann Lake Ltd. This time I got frames entirely made of plastic. For $20 I also got a feeder (made of plastic as well) and a slatted rack (made of wood) to place just above the bottom board. Before the end of the month I have to place an order for bee packages. I do not know if I should get one or two.

October 29th 2006
I removed the apistan from both hives. The south hive has syrup left from last time so I did not gibve them more. I gave syrup to the north hive. I also gave a last treatment of tetracyclin to both hives. I was able to see brrod in the upper box of the north hive. I did not see any in the upper box of the south hive. I did not check the lower box.

October 22nd 2006
I gave syrup and tetracycline to both hives.

October 15th 2006
All the sugar and tetracycline have desapeared so I gave a second treatment to boh hives. A little condensation is going on on the inside of the cover. I should try to improve ventilation. I did not have any syrup ready.

October 6th 2006
I gave syrup to both hives as well as a first treatment of tetracycline. It was not warm so I did not want to spend too much time checking the frames but I have seen nice brood frames in the north hive. In the south hive I have not seen any brood in the upper box which is full of honey instead. I did not check in the lower box. It looks strong with a lot of bees, more that in the north hive. In both hives the bees were very quiet.

September 25th 2006
Nora told me the bees came back this morning on the spot where I cleaned the boxes and frames yesterday. They were not as numerous and they did not stay long but that is interesting to see they had recorded the event.

September 24th 2006
I had a bad idea today. I wanted to clean by frames and supers and I was worried I might create a mess inside the house with all the propolis I had to scrape so in went in front of the house and started checking the frames. I actually have seen a few wax moth larvae so I will have to freeze every thing again. At first every thing was going well and easy but the, slowly, I started being surrounded by an increasing number of bees with a few yellow jackets. I was in front of the house, in plain view from the street. I ended up having to shake each frame to remove the bees and put them back in a box under a piece of clothe. I got stung four times. I deserved it. I wont do it again.

September 23th 2006
Today I wanted to inspect the hives and I was thinking I would move a frame of eggs from my good hive (south hive) to my queenless hive (north hive). As soon as I opened the north hive, I could tell the bees looked healthy and happy. After checking a few frames I discovered nice large arrays of capped brood. There is a queen and she has been laying eggs for the last 9 days at least. I gave both hives a gallon of syrup, I installed entrance reducers and spacers between the boxes to improve ventilation.

September 10th 2006
Today I removed the supers from the south hive. The bees have cleaned the frames and started feeling them up already. Next year I will give them the frames back for only 3 days. I placed two apistan strips in the bottom hive body and installed the feeder with a gallon of syrup. I looked at the north hive. No eggs there and no more brood cells. I still gave them apistan strips and a gallon of syrup. I guess that if eggs do not appear next week, that hive is doomed.

September 4th 2006
I placed the supers back on the south hive and removed the super from the north hive. I replaced it with a feeder with half a gallon of syrup. I do not know what I should be doing with that hive.

September 3rd 2006
We spent the after noon spinning. We extracted something like 70 pounds.

September 2nd 2006
Today, we took the supers out with the help of a few friends. We started looking in the north hive. There, the population looks strong and there are no traces of wax moth anymore. The probleme now is that there is no queen anymore. We have seen a few brood cells from which youg bees were emerging so it looks like the queen vanished at the time of my last visite, three weeks ago. We have seen a few (~8) empty queen cells. The super is essentially empty, no surprise there. We took the four supers from the other hive. The kids were the first one to enjoy this year's honey. The bees have started removing honey from the lower frames. We should better have done the harvest a week or two ago.

August 13th 2006
I added one super to the south hive without checking inside. After checking the north hive, I decided to give them one super too.

August 6th 2006
I checked both hives. Nothing special. In the north hive I found a couple of wax moth cocoons again, probably from larvae that were in the frames and that I had not seen.

July 29th 2006
In the south hive the top supper is almost full. In the upper hive body I have seen a few drone cells. I removed the entrance reducer to improve air flow. I should probably have done that earlier. In the north hive, I had the disappointment to find a few wax moth cocoons on one frame in the top box. The bees seemed quite agitated around them. I decided to have a look at the bottom board and there was the most surprising thing: the was a mass of cocoons and larvae the bees were fighting on the bottom board, under the slatted rack. I did not have my camera with me. I would say there was something like 100 larvae I could see. I had no idea wax moths could make a nest like that. I removed all that and I guess it is going to make the bees life much easier. This hive is not going to give me any honey. I should give them syrup. The bottom box contains a lot of brood and larvae.

July 9th 2006
In the north hive, every thing looks good. On side of one frame in the top box is covered with eggs and the bees are occupying all the frames. In the south hive, the bees are cleaning up the frames in the top supper.

July 4th 2006
I gave one gallon of syrup to the north hive.

July 2nd 2006
In the south hive all the brood I saw in the first supper box have been replaced with honey. The two boxes are actually getting close to be full so I added one more. In the north hive, no traces of wax moth and a lot of eggs, young larvae and nice areas of capped brood, so I installed the second hive box. I need to give them syrup. On that hive, I am still using the smallest notch of the entrance reducer.

June 18th 2006
The south hive has a lot of brood. Surprisingly, the queen is laying eggs even in the supper. For that reason I have add one supper on top. In the north hive every thing looked much better than last time but on the last frame I inspected I found a couple of wax moth larvae so I decided to not give them their second hive box back.

June 4th 2006
The south hive has not changed much since last week. Maybe a little more brood and a little more honey in the super. In the north hive, it is a big deception. The bees are doing well but I see patches of combs destroyed and inhabited by wax moth. I took these frames out and placed them in the freezer. I replaced them with frames I had frozen earlier. I think I have seen something like 20 wax moth larvae. They were all concentrated in very small areas. On the frames I left in the hive there aer no traces of wax moth activity. We will see next week. I have been able to see eggs.

May 28th 2006
The south hive looks very good but not much work has been done in the super. Also the two foundation frames that I installed in the top hive box have not made any progress which I find surprizing given the level of activity in the surrounding frames which are covered with brood. The north hive is now fine. There are nice areas of brood and the population is clearly stronger. Pierre Colin was with me and took a few pictures: 1, 2, 3, 4.

May 21th 2006
The south hive is going very well. It is amazing to see these frames 100% covered in brood. The bees have however not started working hard on the super I gave them. The north hive is not going well. It is still fighting with wax moth and there is not that much brood. I should probably get a new queen and I will investigate about that this week. In order to make things better now, I removed the five worse looking frames. My idea was to replace the five frames by some of those I had frozen but I noticed that all the bees were fitting on only three frames. That is a very weak population so I decided to take two of the brood covered frames in the south hive to place them in the north hive. I thought this should boost the population in the north hive and slow down the expansion of the south hive only a little. I just hope it did not hurt the queen when I was shaking all the bees out of the brood frames. I replaced the two frames I took out by new frames with celrite foundation. I guess I now have to wait for next week to see what will have been the result of this. .

May 15th 2006
Today, when I came back from work, I removed the feeder from the south hive and insttalled one supper. At the same time I realized that last week I had forgotten to place the apistan back in the north hive. So I installed the four strips I have in the north hive.

May 14th 2006
The north hive seems to be doing better now. There is brood and I have the impression the population is increasing. It also seems the bees have started to remove the web tunnels formed by the wax moth. I removed some of them too and found two moth larvae that were still alive. I cleaned up the feeder and added some syrup. The south hive is booming. There is plenty of brood in the bottom box (2 frames) and she started in the top box on one frame. There is not too much space left and I found a cup at the bottom of one frame. I should add one supper so I did not put back the apistan strips.

May 7th 2006
Today was time to check on the bees. I was not worried about the south hive as I noticed there was a lot of activity at both the lower and upper entrances. As soon as I opened I could see the queen had been released and after checking the a few frames I was able to spot a few young larvae. The bees had eaten the newspaper between the two boxes. As the queen seems to be installed in the upper box I swapped the upper box and the lower box. I added some syrup. Every thing seems to be going well. The northern hive does not look as good. In the upper box, I saw tunnels made by wax moth larvaes and I even saw two moth walking on the frames I was inspecting. Traces of wax moth were concentrated in the upper box where there are much less bees. I decided to remove the upper box and freeze the frames. I have seen a few larvae. There was still quite some syrup in the feeder so I decided not to add any.

April 30th 2006
Yesterday Nora went to pick up the package of bees I had ordered. This evening, after arriving from Tucson, I looked at the south hive. I found a few larvae, so thingas might be doing better. I found the queen and removed it with two bees. One of the two bees has a mite on its side. Then I removed all the bees from all the frames in the upper box. After cleaning the box I placed it on to of the bottom box with a page of news paper inbetween. Then, I placed 5 frames in the box and dumped all the bees in the space left and slowly installed 4 of the remaining frames. I installed the new queen that came with the bees in her cage with a marshmellow plug, suspended between two frames. I placed the feeder (with half a gallon of syrup) with a little spacer so the bees can go in and out until they merge with the bees in the bottom box.

April 23th 2006
I checked on the bees today. In the south hive I have not seen one mite. I have not seen one larva or one egg either. In the north hive, I have seen larvae, but only very developed ones. It is possible that both queen simply stopped laying eggs as a result of the bad weather we have had a week ago. In both hives there were dead bees in their cells. In both hives, the bees do not seem to have used much syrup.

April 8th 2006
Today the weather was nice enough to have a peek in the hives. The south hive does not look good. I could not find larvae nor capped brood. The bees still have not used the tetracycline medication I gave them. In the north hive, I could not see any eggs but I saw some young larvae and a few drone cells. In both hive I see many bees dead in their cell. Here and there there is mold. The syrup in the feeder seemed fermented so I removed it, rinsed the feeders and shared 1 gallon of syrup between the two hives.

March 5th 2006
We got some apistan against varoa mites and I placed the strips in the hives. In the southern hives I have seen a few mites again but I also have seen larvae. That means I have a queen and she lay eggs. So the situation is not as bad as I thought. Still there are only very few bees in there.

February 26th 2006
This week end was really nice so yesterday I prepared some syrup (10 poounds of sugar for 5 gallons of water) and this afternoon by a temperatre of more than 60F (15C) I inspected the hives. Both hives are covered with bee droppings, especially the south one. The south hive also seems much less active than the north one. At the entrance of the north hive I have seen several bees coming back with pellets of polen attached to their legs. I do not know where they found that at this time of the year. There is also much more dead bees on the ground in front of the north hive than in front of the south hive. In the south hive, things are not looking good. I have not seen one cell of brood nor one egg. The number of bees seems very small. There is still a lot of honey and polen stored. I have seen several bees with illformed wings and I could spot three bees with a varoa mite. Also I have not seen one drone. In the north hive, it looks much better. I have seen brood, I have not seen eggs but it was cloudy and they would have been difficult to see. I have not noticed any mite nor bees with weird wings. There are a lots of bees. Int both hives I cleaned the bottom board and the slatted rack. The south hive had a lot of dead bees. That might be why the bees chewed a new opening just above the entrance reducer. In both hives, there were more bees in the top box, so I swapped the top and bottom boxes. In both hives I sprinkled a handfull of my mixture of sugar and tetracycline and poured a gallon of syrup. This week I need to get some apistan against the varoas and talk with people in Jone's bee company to see what I should do about my south hive. I do not think it is going to make it and I will have to get a new package of bees with a queen.

November 1st 2005
Shared ~11 quarts of syrub between the two hives.

October 26th 2005
Shared 11 quarts of syrup between the two hives.

October 15th 2005
Today was the day to remove the apistan. It was also a good chance to check every thing in detail. In the South hive almost the entire top box is full of capped honey. There is also some brood which I was not expecting. In the bottom box there is a lot of uncapped honey and a lot of polen. In the north hive, there is a lot more brood. I would say there is something like 2 frames worth of brood. I also notice drone cells and drones walking around on the frames which I did not notice in the other hive. In therms of capped honey, this hive is much less advanced than the other. However it seems there is much more polen. The hive is still messy with a lot of wax construction joining adjacent frames. In both hives I have seen young larvae but I failed to see any eggs, possibly because of the sun being not high enough in the sky. I got stung on the leg through my jeans. I think I should give them syrup once more.

October 12th 2005
Today I gave the two hives 3 gallon sof thick syrup again.

October 9th 2005
Yesterday night I prepared thick syrup and today I shared the 3 gallons I had between the feeders of the two hives. This evening I checked and the feeders were almost dry!

October 8th 2005
This morning I gave the third and last dose of tetracycline. Bees are still working outside. I have seen many coming back with their baskets full of polen. The feeders are empty again so I have to prepare some syrup.

October 5th 2005
This morning I shared I shared one gallon and a half of syrup between the two hives.

October 4th 2005
This morning it was cold and rainy. I decided to install entrance reducers in their widest position in front of both hives. In the evening, I check the supers again and I found more was mothes. I took the frame in the freezer out, placed them in a super in a garbage gab and placed one super worth of frames in the freezer.

September 24th 2005
I gave the bees a second dose of tetracycline. I checked the super frames and I found a few mothes. I took them out and placed the frames in the freezer. I should go through all of them.

September 14th 2005
This evening I removed the inner cover and installed a feeder on each hive. I poured 1 gallon of thick syrup in each feeder (6 quarts of water for 20lb of sugar). Before placing the feeder I dropped a handful of a mixture of powdered sugar and tetracycline. I will have to do that again 10 days from now again 10 days later. I did not use my smoker and I think I should have to push the bees away before dropping the powdered sugar.

September 11th 2005
I think I placed apistan strips against varoa mites. I should always note what I do on the same day. Anyway, I placed to strips in each lower deep hive body.I should remove them before the 30th of October.

September 10th 2005
Nora went to a lotion making class at Jone's bees. I was at the Wasatch beekeeper association at the Utah State Fair from 10AM until 2PM.

September 5th 2005
I took the supers off the hives again. The cells that have been cleaned are really clean. But instead of moving all that honey to the deeps the bees have moved it to a few cells that are now really full on each frame, in the upper third.

September 2nd 2005
The last few days have been spent filtering the honey that we could not filter the day we extracted. All in all we got 15 5 pounds bottles, 20 2 pounds bottles and an unknown number of 1 poud jars. Filtering has been very long, much longer than we though it would be. I guess next year we will have to install a heater where we extract to make the honey more fluide. Since we were done, it was also time to clean up every thing. Honey goes away easily but wax is often difficult to remove. We also rinced the wax from the capings with hot water and we melted it an poured it in a juice carton to let it cool over the night.

August 30th 2005
Today I placed the frames back in the hives in hope the bees will clean up the honey that remains.

August 28th 2005
This after noon was dedicated to extractingthe honey, so I decided I would inspect the hives body around noon to check the amount of honey. In each hive I counted something like 5 frames covered both sides with honey, a lotof pollen and surprisingly a lot of brood. In the north hive, there was what I think is a superceeding queen cell. It was a queen cell that was at one third from the bottom of the frame. I decided not to cut it out and let them do their business. I hope that is not a mistake. The bees are clearly lacking space or maybe do they have difficulty maintaining the temperature low enoughL they spend a lot of time at the entrance, especially in the north hive. Extraction is a mess, every thing get sticky, honey and wax get every where but it was a good time. Many friends stopped by to help cranking and uncaping. In the evening when we stopped we still had to go through one super. We did it on the following evening.

August 27th 2005
I have been away since the end of July and I think that now is time to get the honey out. This afternoon a friend came over to help. One was taking the frames out one by one, shaking the bees out, pass the frame to the other a few steps away for him to store it in a spare super and cover every thing with a piece of cloth after making sure no bees came along. It went rather smoothly and only took one hour for each hive.

July 24th 2005
Today, as I approached the hives, a bee just flew to my face and stung me on the cheek. I suspect this resulted from my garlic smell as I had a lot of garlic on the previous day. I checked the top of the north hive and there was no need to add a super. Then I checked the south hive and found nice frames of capped honey in the three first shallows and not much done yet in the forth one. In the top hive body I was able to see frames of eggs and brood and as I tried to show larvae to a friend I simply dropped a frame on the ground. The bees did not like it. I put every thing back and watched the bees walk back home.

July 17th 2005
I opened the north hive. Not much work has been done in the third super. The two other supers are getting capped. The bees are still messy which makes me spend a lot of time with them with the wive open. When I started inspecting the upper hive body they became really agressive. I received four or five stings on my right hand and they were flying to my face trying to discourge me from bothering them. They won and I was soon putting every thing back together after having seen a couple of frames with honey and brood. I did not have time to check for eggs. In the south hive I only gave a look at the top super which is full. I decided to give them one more super (it now has four!) and did not go look deeper in the boxes.

July 10th 2005
I have been away for the week and Nora went to Jone's bee for me to get two more supers in case the bees kept working as fast as before my last visit. After putting them together I looked at both hives very quickly, just checking the upper shallow. The north hive has filled it's second super and I decided to give it a third one. The south hive has not been progressing much on its third one. On each frame only the central region is fully drawn and contains a little honey. I'll give both hives a full inspection next week.

July 3rd 2005
We looked at the south hive with Lucy. The top super is full and I clearly need to add one more. That is only 8 days since I gave them that box! It is a good thing I got two yesterday. The rest of the hive looks fine and I was able to find eggs. There are still less drone cells in this hive than in the north one. This evening we also melted the wax I have collected since the beginning.

July 2nd 2005
This morning I went to Jone's bee company to get two supers. After assembling and painting the boxes and putting the frames together, I opened the north hive. There, the bees have not made much progress in their top super so I will not give them one of my new ones today. In the first one they have capped most of the honey. In the main boxes I have seen eggs as well as nice frames of brood. The bees are still messy but things are looking much nicer than three weeks ago.

June 27th 2005
There are a few dead bees in front of the hives. Today I noticed a little wasp working at cutting the deads heads off to suck the inside. I also saw it fly away with one head a couple of times. Then I noticed a tiny ant that was draging away one of the remaining abdomens cut by the wasp.

June 26th 2005
Today I looked at the north hive. The shallow super is almost fully covered with combs and honey. The deep hive bodies are still very difficult to work with and I damaged a comb of capped honey. The bees have been once more producing burr combs connecting frames together. I got my first sting while manipulating the frames. I noticed important clusters of drone cells. I do not remember seeing as many of them in the other hive. I added a shallow super on the north hive too.

June 25th 2005
In the afternoon the weather has been oscillating between nice and stormy. Toward 5PM, it looked good enough and I decided to visit the bees. I worked on my smoker to get a strong fire and used some smoker fuel. For the first time I had no problem with the smoker! I opened the south hive. I was really surprised to see that all the frames of the shallow super I added 10 days ago are covered with fully drawn combs that are full of honey. It is not capped yet but there is no more space. It was clear I had to add one more super. In the two deep body I found eggs, larvae, capped honey and pollen. Very little burr combs and one or two of these spherical cells pointing down. Every thing looked really nice. Has it was starting to rain, I placed a second shallow super. I was not able to look at the north hive. I noticed that at dusk a few hours after I placed one more super on the south hive there were no more bees at the entrance of the south hive while there were a lot of them at the entrance of the northern hive. I am going to run out of supers so I clearly have to buy more of them. I also should think about getting a honey extractor and the miscellaneous equipment I will need with it.

June 18th 2005
Today, for the first time since Tuesday, I do not have propolis on my hands any more. It looks better but the pleasant smell of my hands is also gone. The kitchen door knob is still a little sticky.

June 15th 2005
I think that today I made my first mistake: I decided to inspect my northern hive before going to work. It was 9AM and there were way too many bees home. The north hive is less advanced than the south one. Two frames were still not used in the top box. There is a lot of brood and little capped honey in comparison. This is probably linked to the fact the bees in that hive are constructing a lot of burr combs. The combs were strongly bulging and it was impossible to remove the frames and then put them back with out damaging them and crushing many bees. The situation was further complicated by my smoker which kept coming off. Fighting with the smoker I even set fire to our picnic table. Our neighbor was there to put fire off. It was a stressful visit. There were many downward looking cells at the bottom of the frames. I think I removed a good pound of a mixture of wax and larva. My hive tool was covered with the milky blood from the larvae I had to kill. After inspecting the bottom box I placed back to top box on top with many bees hanging from underneath. I think I injured many bees then as well. I hope the queen is fine and that the colony will soon recover. I am not sure I will. I did not get one sting while I deserved a few. I did not place the feeder back on this hive either and I added a shallow super. I'll check on both hives early next week. I was told swarming is now unlikely as it is too late in the season.

June 14th 2005
I have been away for a long time. I removed the entrance reducer from both hives. This evening around 6PM I opened my south hive. Right away I could see it was overcrowding: the bees had started constructing combs in the feeder. In the top box all the frames are now used. I am starting to have some capped honey. There is even a frame that is almost completely covered on one side. It was quite difficult to get the frames out as every thing is glued with propolis. So much that soon I could not take any pictures without covering my new camera with glue. On one frame I saw a region of ~20 cells that was not looking nice. I could not smell anything but I decided to scrape the wax there. The pupa looked normal. The central frames were bulging at the bottom with big spherical cells pointing downward. They do not look like the queen cells I have seen in books but I tried to remove them as I suspected them of being an indication of the swarming temptation the bees must be experiencing due to my slowlyness at giving them the space they need. In the bottom box, I was surprised to see that the two frames on the sides were not used yet. I decided to exchange the top and bottom box. They are really heavy now and difficult to move around. I did not place the feeder back on top of the hive and installed a shallow super without the queen excluder. I hope this will give the bees enough space for some time at least. I am still not doing well with the smoker which is always off when I need it. The honey in the burr combs I recovered from the feeder is delicious.

May 20th 2005
I opened the hives with some apprehension today but every thing looks fine. In fact a lot of work was done by the bees since last time. They are now using the two boxes for both brood and storage. In each box there is no more than 5 frames on which they have not drawn full combs. I guess I will put shallow supers at my next visit which will be only almost three weeks from now as I will be away. The northern hive had burr combs containing larva. I had to tear it apart. I was a little surprised to see a row of bulging cells at the bottom of a frame. They are no hanging so I guess these simply are drone cells. I am still amazed by the range of pollen colors. I noticed a few bees vibrating up and down at times on the frames. I guess this is one of the communication dances. I will try to take a movie next time. I am still as bad with the smoker. The feeders were empty so I shared 2/3 of a gallon between the two hives.

May 8th 2005
It was a little too soon after the last visit but I am going to be away for more than a week so I decided to have a look again today. It might have been a good thing. I started with the southern hive. I counted 5 frames covered to better than a third with combs used for honey. On the side of one frame we noticed some mold growing. First reason of concerns. That probably results from the rain we got and from a poor ventilation. The bees had not enough time to construct burr combs but they are clearly working at it. In the bottom box, many brood cells were empty as new bees must have come out of them. I had difficulties finding eggs but I found some as well as larvae. In the northern hive I counted three frames in the top box used for honey. In the bottom box, quite like in the southern hive, a couple of frames are used for honey and three or four frames were covered in brood with many cells open and empty. There I really had difficulties finding eggs but I finally found some but I am still a little worried. Now the thing that got me really worried is the fact that I have seen 3 bees producing an incredible amount of feces yellow to brown in color. That was on the outside of the hive, on the inside every thing is clean. But still that made me think of dissentry. In order to improve ventilation, I switched to the large entrance reduction and I place a match between the feeder and the top box in order to let some air in. I guess we will see when I'll come back next week.

May 5th 2005
During last visit, I noticed the feeders were empty. Yesterday evening, I prepared some syrup and this evening around 11PM I went to the hive to put some syrup. I lifted the cover of the northern hive, removed the burr combs I had placed there and pour some syrup. I noticed the light was attracting the bees who started coming up so I quickly closed. In the southern hive, I did not even have the time to remove the combs the bees were coming up. I guess they keep more active at night now because of the higher temperature (13 centigrade degrees).

May 3rd 2005
Second visit. Both hives are about the same. There were quite some burr combs and some frames had to be pulled apart. The combs I removed were mostly used for honey so I placed them in the feeder for the bees to clean them. In both hives the activity is concentrated in the bottom box. There is a lot of brood on the two central frames I would say. I could see eggs in each cell around the brood area and larvae at the bottom of the frames. Frames further from the center are used for honey as well as central frames in the upper box, especially in the north hive. Next time I will have to measure more carefully the area used for brood and honey. Once more my smoker went off. I really have to work on that. In the mean time the cat is interested.

April 23th 2005
Today we visited the bees for the first time since their installation. I proceeded the same way for both hives. First I smoked the entrance and then gave a few puffs under the cover. I then placed the cover upside-down on the ground, took off the feeder and placed it on the cover. I started with the southern hive (the one on the left in pictures). There, not much was going on in the upper box so I removed it and placed it on top of the feeder on the ground. Then I saw that the marshmallow was not plugging the queen's cage. Good news! In the space where the queen had been hanging, the bees had built burr combs. I took the frame out to cut the burr combs out. I was able to see an egg in each cell and showed them to Louis. We then looked at a few other frames. I noticed areas where the wax is brown. Next time I will take close up pictures. We then put everything back in place. Also I have to learn how to better use the smoker which was off by that time. We then took care of the northern hive. There, it was as I expected from listening to the hive, the bees were all concentrated in the top box. I decided to swap the two boxes. I gave the top one to Louis and while he was holding it I moved the bottom one out. I was able to see the queen had been released as well. Then I placed the top box in the place of the bottom one and we inspected the frames. Since the bees had been working in the top box where the frames were regularly spaced there was no burr comb. We have been able to see one egg in each cell and all looked well. I think the northern hive was more advanced than the southern one. We then closed up the northern hive. They are incredibly gentle, not one sting was received and they remained very quiet in both hive during the entire time of the inspection. Less than half an hour after we were done, activity outside the hives seemed normal. On the next morning, before the bees woke up I added some syrup in both feeders.

April 21st 2005
Since the 18th the weather is grey, cold and rainy. The bees do not go out much. This morning I lifted the hives top cover and refilled the feeders with syrup.

April 17th 2005
This morning we were a little worried as there was not much activity on the entrance of the hives. This after noon around 4PM however,  I think we can say we are in "beesness" (film).

April 16th 2005
That was the day! We first went to Jones Bee Company to get the bees. Hugo is inspecting them in the garage after we sprayed them with some water and syrup. The hives were ready in the backyard. Following the advice of someone I met at Jones Bee Company, I had added one deep hive body to each in order to facilitate the introduction of the bees. Toward 5PM, it was time to start puting the bees in their new homes. First thing: removing the syrup can and the queen cage. Here she is! After getting some marshmallows (we had forgotten to buy some so Nora had to run to the grocery store) to replace the cork of her cage, I hung her between two frames in the lower deep hive body. The next thing was to dump the rest of the bees (movie) on her and to place the frames (1,2,3) in the upper deep hive body. In the first hive, I had not shaken hard enough the box and many bees were still inside.  I dumped them on a plank (1) at the entrance and they kindly walked home.  Just after sunset there were only a few lost bees wandering outside.

April 15th 2005
Well, we finally moved out of Iowa and are now setteled in Salt-Lake-City, Utah. We have a relatively large backyard where I am going to install two hives. In fact I have already installed the hives and the bees are arriving tomorrow. I ordered two packages of two and a half pounds of bees with a queen in each from Jones Bee Company. I will get them tomorrow morning and place them in the hives tomorrow evening. We have invited a few friends and it should be an interesting evening.

May 15th 2004
It has been quite colder this week, close to freezing at night. It is really impressive to feel the humid warmth expelled at the entrance of the hive. It was forming condensation on the bottom board. Now the temperature is increasing and the bees resume a more intense activity. Hugo likes to go watch the bees.

May 11th 2004
Ok, a lots of things happened. First of all, it seems I am getting a job at the Department of Physics at the University of Utah in Salt-Lake-City. I already found a beekeeping supplies company located in Salt-Lake-City: Jones Bee Company. Isn't Utah nicknamed the "Honey Bee State"? But that might be for other reasons. Anyway, we are not there yet but it did not make much sense to start a colony while being likely to leave at the beginning of August. This did not stop Beth who got her hive full of bees on Saturday May 8th. I was not there but Beth told me how it went. John Johnson -our bee provider- stapled the hive body to the bottom board in order to make it easy to move the hive from his field to Beth's backyard. He then switched out his box at his field location with Beth's box and then proceded to transfer the frames into the new empty hive box one at a time. Beth says tt was very interesting to see that immediately the field bees were coming back to the new box at the location coordinates they were oriented to not to a specific box itself. They examined each frame, looking for the queen or evidence that the nuc was "queen right" which means that she is active and doing her queenly duty (i.e. laying eggs). The nucleus of Buckfast (developed in the Buckfast abbey by Brother Adam) consisted of 7 frames which contained various stages of freshly deposited eggs, larvae, capped brood, pollen and honey stores, and newly collected dandelion nectar. They were completed with 3 frames of Rite-Cell. Today, Beth wanted to install the slatted rack back in place as well as a second hive body. We came back from work at lunch time, put our suits on and, in no time, we had removed the staples, placed the slatted rack on the bottom board under the hive body and installed a second hive body on top. The top hive body contains rite-cell frames on which the bees now have to draw combs. We'll see how it goes in a few days.

May 1st 2004
There is notthing new really but the hive looks so good in the sun, I decided to make a picture. I added a bird bath where the bees will find water. They should arrive a week from now!

April 24th 2004
It all started during summer 2003 when we went to the Reiman Garden in Ames Iowa. I had always been interested in bee keeping. As a kid, I remember my uncle tending his twenty or so hives in the country side near Pluvigner in Brittany in the west of France. So when I saw "Beekeeping for dummies" by  Howland Blackinson in the gift shop, I knew I was going to do everything I can to keep bees. 
After a few hours spent on the web, I subscribed to Bee Culture (~$20 for one year of really good information about beekeeping). I also looked at equipment prices. We decided to go for the deluxe kit from Mann Lake Ltd.  ($300). At the same time, I bought "ABC-XYZ of Bee Culture" which seems to be a very complete reference. For the hive I also  got a slatted rack and a hive top feeder as well as an extra veil  from Brushy Mountain Bee Farm ($45 total). To this you have to add a few cans of white paint and primer (~$15) and 4 cinder blocks to put the hive on. So here I am with the hive installed in the backyard, impatient to get the bees from John Johnson, a local beekeeper.

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Z...

May 10th 2008
Aujourd'hui j'ai donné un gallon de syrop à chaque ruche. Dans la ruche de devant les abeilles n'utilisaient pas dutout le sirop de leur mangeoire. J'ai suspecté qu'il y avait quelque chose de mauvais avec ce sirop qui était peut être vieux je l'ai donc jeté et remplacé par du sirop frais. J'ai enlevé tous les réducteurs d'entrée.

May 4th 2008
Avec Michel nous avons vérifié les ruches. Nous avons vu des larves et du couvain sous opercule dans chacune. Nous avons cherché la reine dans la ruche de devant et nous l'avons trouvé assez facilement. Il n'y a pas encore trop d'abeilles. Nous avons donné un quart de gallon de sirop dans les ruches nord et sud. Il y a plein de sirop dans la ruche de devant.

April 27th 2008
Avec Julien, nous avons vérifié les trois ruches. Nous avons vu des oeufs dans chacune et des larves dans la ruche nord et dans celle de devant. La ruche sud semble démarer plus lentement.

April 19th 2008
Ce matin, je suis allé chercher trois boites d'abeilles. La dernière ruche (celle de devant) est finalement morte avec un cas de diarrhé terrible. Les deux autres sont mortes au début de l'hiver. Brian est venu et nous avons instalé les abeilles avec la même méthode que la dernière fois: placer la reine dans sa cage avec un bouchon de chamalo entre deux cadres et la boite d'abeilles à l'envers juste au dessus. Le lendemain, j'ai enlevé la boite d'abeilles vide et mis les cadres dans le corp de ruche supérieure. J'ai donné un gallon de sirop a chaque ruche.

November 4th 2007
The south hive looks the same as last week. The syrup has not been used at all. I removed the apistan. Next week I might remove the top box so they have less space to deal with. The front hive looks good and the feeder was empty so I gave it half a gallon of syrup. The north hive looks ok but the syrup has not been used much.

October 28th 2007
The front hive looks really good. The north hive looks slow but still ok eventhough it has a lot of condensatio. The south hive is dying. There are very few bees, very little honey and polen, no brood, a few larvae and dead bees that never fully made it out of their cell. I do not know what is going on but I think it does not have one chance to make it.I gave syrup to all three hives, a treatment of teramicine and I removed the apistan from the front and north hive. I placed an entrance reducer to the smallest position on the south hive.

September 30th 2007
Yesterday it was cold and raining so I could not do anything. Today it is better but I am leaving at noon so I had to open the hives when it was still a little cold. I started by giving the north hive a dose of tetracycline and a gallon of syrup. Then I worked on the front hive. Removing the feeder was really hard, I had to use by hive tool between the bottom of the feeder and the frames to unglue them one by one. Once it was done, I gave tetracycline and syrup to that hive. Then I went to the south hive and removed all the frames from the super. There is quite a lot of honey in there, most uncapped. I then placed apistan strips in the bottom box, tetracycline on top of the upper frames and a gallon of syrup. I placed entrance reducers in front of each hive.

September 28th 2007
The feeder of the front hive is empty. All the plastic frames in the upper box are glued to the feeder. I will fight with that tomorrow. Today I was just having a quick peek. The feeder of the north hive showed a lot of condensation, it is made of plastic. Plastic is just bad in hives I think. I checked a few frames and they look. I looked at the south hive and there is no more brood in the super so I will be able to remove it tomorrow. This evening I have to prepare syrup.

September 6th 2007
I removed all the boxes from which we had extracted honey. I took all the frames I found with brood in the super I left on the northern hive and put them in the super I left on the southern hive. I placed apistan strips in the front and north hive and I gave these two hives their first teramicine treatment. I also gave the front and the north hive a galon of syrup each. For the southern hive, I'll wait for the brood in the super to be born so I can take the super away before treatment.

September 1st 2007
I placed all the boxes back on the hives. All the brood in the uper I placed back on the south and north hive still has to come out.

August 28th 2007
That has been a long time with no entries in this log book. We have been away to mexico for a while and bee-wise,the summer, after a complicated beginning has been uneventful. Two weeks ago I added a third super on to of the front hive. The other two hives had not been making much progress on the last super I gave them. We have extracted the honey from the three hive last weekend (August 25-26) and all in all we estimated we got 200 pounds of honey (more than three 5 gallon buckets). the first supers of the north and south hives contained some brood so I assembled the brood frames in each hive and place them in one super box on each hive. I completed the remaining space with empty frames. Next year I will use queen excluders on each hive. The extraction went well, many people came over to help. Filtering at the same time we extract is not efficient because the sieve creates a bottle neck in the process. The best is to let the unfiltered honey in a bucket for a few hours. This gives time to most of the wax to migrate to the top and then the filtering is much easier. I need to put the boxes back on the hives for a few days and then start treatments and feeding.

June 13th 2007
I added a second super on the front hive. The south hive has larvae developing. I think it really swarmed. It is interesting no one noticed the swarm. I did not check the northern hive again.

June 10th 2007
The front hive is working on its super. There are nice frames of brood. The south hive is weird. The are no larvae in the two deep hive boxes. The first shallow however containes a lot of eggs. I carefully checked and have not seen more than one egg per cell. It might be we really got a swarm and the new queen just started laying eggs, for some reason in the first shallow. I don't know. In the north hive, the new queen is working. There are brood frames, not very compact but still brood frames. When pulling up a frame I broke a few cells containing larvae and on one of them I could clearly see a varoa. No surprise. The bees have started drawing combs in the upper shallow.

June 5th 2007
The front hive seems almost fully occupied so I removed the feeder and aded a shallow super and an inner cover. The south hive does not seems very active and I have the impression there are not that many bees. Did I get a swarm? I could not look deep in the hive as the weather was stormy and I wanted to go back to work. The North hive is very active. All the frames from the upper shallow super are full so I added one more with celrite fundation that need combs to be drawn.

May 26th 2007
I removed the cork plug of the queen's cage and replaced it with a marsh mallow.

May 25th 2007
I added one gallon of syrup to the front hive. The south hive is not doing much progress. It has several queen cells at the bottom of the frames in the upper deep. I deceided not to remove them. I got a queen for the north hive. It looks small and black and I am not sure I got an italian. I installed it in its cage with a wooden cork between two frames of the bottom deep. I added a shallow super on the top of the north hive as it seems the bees have been moving a lot of honey up in the hive.

May 20th 2007
La ruche de devant va bien de même que la ruche sud. La ruche nord n'a toujours pas de reine. Les cellules de reines que j'avai remarquées la semaine dernière sont maintenant vides et il est possible que l'une d'elles soit en vol nuptiale. Les deux boites de corps de ruche sont pleines de miel et assez difficiles a bouger. Même si j'introduisais une reine maintenant, je ne suis pas certain de la place qu'elle trouverait pour pondre ses oeufs. Il faudra que je parle de ca chez Jones Bee Company pour qu'ils me donnent quelques conseils. J'ai ajouté une hausse sur chacune des ruches sud et nord.

May 11th 2007
La ruche de devant va bien avec de beaux cadres de couvain. J'ai ajouté le second corps de ruche et mis un gallon de sirop dans la mangeoire qui était sèche. La ruche sud semble aller bien aussi mais je dirai qu'il n'y a pas beaucoup de couvain. Cela peut être la conséquence du fait que c'est déjà la deuxième saison pour cette reine. J'ai ajouté une hausse car celui du haut est déjà assezx plein. La ruche nord n'a plus de reine. J'ai du la tuer lors de ma dernière visite. J'ai trouvé quatre cellules de reines dans le milieu de cadres de la boite du bas. Je pense que la reine était toujours vivante lors de ma dernière visite car le niveau de dévelopement des cellules de reines suggè qu'elles ont été démarées à partir d'oeuf qui on maintenant au moins neuf jours et de pas plus de seize jours (cela prend quinze jours pour faire un reine). Les cellules de reines que j'ai vu il y a douze jours étaient avancées de au moins douze jours elles aussi et il y avaient de jeunes larves. Donc cette ruche n'avait commencé à produire des reines parcequ'elle n'en avait pas. Maintenant par contre, les abeilles tentent de produire un reine parcequ'elles n'en n'ont plus. Demain, je verrai si je peux en obtenir une chez Jone's bee company.

6 Mai 2007
Il faisait froid ce weekend et je ne suis pas allé voir les abeilles. J'ai juste ajouté un gallon de sirop dans la mangeoire de la ruche de devant.

30 Avril 2007
La ruche de devant semble aller bien. La moitié des cadres sont mainentant occupés. La mangeoire était sèche. J'ai ajouté un gallon de sirop. Les abeilles consomment toujours les protéines. La ruche sud semble aller bien. J'ai enlevé l'apistan et la mangeoire et j'ai ajouté une hausse. J'ai aussi enlevé le reducteur d'entrée. La ruche nord a fait beaucoup de progrès sur sa seconde hausse. Au bas des cadres de du corps de ruche supérieur, j'ai trouvé de nombreuses cellules de reines. La pluspart contenaient des reines à divers stades de dévelopement. Plusieurs cellules de reines étaient aussi déjà vides. Je les ai toutes enlevé dans l'espoir de décourager la formation d'un essaim si c'est bien de cela qu'il s'agit. J'ai vu des jeunes larve et il y a donc bien une reine en place. J'ai enlevé le réducteur d'antrée.

22 Avril 2007
Le temps a été assez froid et gris tout le weekend et je n'ai donc pu faire qu'une visite rapide. La ruche de devant semble aller bien. La mangeoire était sèche. Je n'ai pas vérifié les cadres mais j'ai pu voir que les abeilles construisent des rayonages. La ruche sud semble faible. Quand j'ai ouvert j'ai trouvé un cocon de mite a cire et j'ai donc décidé de vérifier quelques cadres. Je n'ai pas vu d'audre mites mais il faudrait peut être que je regarde attentivement la semaine prochaine quand il fera meilleurs. Il y a de beaux cadres de couvain et les abeilles emblent plus nombreuses que la semaine dernière. Il y avait un peu de syrop de rest et j'en ai ajouté. Je n'ai fait que soulevé le couvercle intérieur de la ruche nord. Je n'ai pas sorti de cadre mais j'ai pu voir que les abeilles construsent des rayonnages.

April 15th 2007
Ce matin nous sommes allés plonger avec un tuba à seabase près de Grantsville. Nous avons été entourés de poissons un peu comme si c'était des abeilles. C'est un endroit vraiment intéressant. Dans le SaltLake Tribune nous avons bien trouvé l'article sur la journée des abeilles mais nous n'y étions pas en photo. L'après-midi, nous avons ouvert la ruche de devant. La boite d'abeilles était vide et la reine avait été libérée. J'ai donc tout enlevé. Il n'était pas possible de placer la mangeoire directement à cause de l'épaisseur de la galette de protéines. J'ai donc placé la galette d'un côté de la mangeoire et dans l'autre j'ai versé près d'un gallon de sirop. Ensuite nous sommes allés voir la ruche sud qui semble aller mieux. La mangeoire était sèche. Nous avons trouvé de beaux cadres de couvain dans la hausse du bas. J'ai mis près d'un gallon de sirop dans la mangeoire. La ruche nord semble en pleine forme. Si bien que j'ai ajouté une boite. J'ai utilisé l'une de mes nouvelles boites avec des cadres en plastique. Je ne les aime pas tellement mais cela ira bien pour les abeilles et cela leur donnera quelque chose à faire. Je n'ai pas regardé la boite du bas.

April 14th 2007
Ce matin nous sommes allés chez Jones Bees pour prendre notre paquet d'abeilles. Dave Jones m'a donné un bon conseil pour installer les abeilles dans la ruche. Nous avons été photographiés et interviewés par des journalistes du SaltLake Tribune. J'ai installé la reine dans sa cage entre deux cadres apr&egrasve;s avoir bouché la cage avec du sucre mouillé. A côté de la reine, sur les barres de cadre, j'ai placé la cannette de sirop et une galette de protéines. En suite j'ai placé la boite d'abeilles sur le haut des cadres avec son ouverture juste au dessus de la reine. C'était vraiment rapide. Peu de temps après avoir refermé la ruche, nous pouvions voir des abeilles qui rentraient et sortaient de la ruche. Les trois ruches sont superbes!

April 7th 2007
Nous avons vérifié les deux ruches avec Oscar. La ruche sud semble toujours un peu faible mais ca va. Nous lui avons ajouté du sirop et donné de la tetracycline. La ruche nord est pleine à craquer. Il y a pas mal de faux bourdons et de cellules de faux bourdons. Les boites sont si lourdes qu'elles sont difficiles à déplacer. J'ai décidé d'enlever la mangeoire et les bandes d'apistan et d'ajouter une boite pour donner plus d'espace aux abeilles.

April 1st 2007
Aujourd'hui j'ai peint les deux hausses prises aux deux ruches. Par moment l'activité à l'entrée de la ruche sud était aussi intense qu'à l'entrée de la ruche nord.

March 31st 2007
Depuis ma dernière visite, le temps a été beaucoup plus froid et nous avons même eu de la neige. Je n'ai donc pas pu réouvrir les ruches avant aujourd'hui. J'ai donné à la ruche nord son deuxieme traitement de tetracycline et un litre de sirop. Dans la ruche sud, la mangeoire est dans le même état que la semaine dernière et les abeilles n'ont pratiquement pas touché à la tetracycline. Je suis allé voir dans la hausse du bas directement pour y choisir un cadre de couvain que j'enmènerai chez Jones bee pour leur demander leur avis. L'aspect des cadres était bien meilleur. J'ai quand même trouvé un cadre avec des nymphes en décomposition. Ches Jones Bees, il m'ont dit que cela ne ressemble pas à la loque mais que plus vraissemblablement j'ai du couvain qui est mort suite au froid conjugué avec un manque d'abeilles dans la ruche. Bonnes nouvelles! J'ai pris des galettes de protéines pour donner un coup de pousse à cette ruche. Dans l'après midi j'ai replacé le cadre dans la ruche et installY la galette.

25 Mars 2007
Aujourd'hui j'ai encore vérifié les deux ruches. Je voulai leur donner un premier traitement de tetracycline et leur donner du syrop. Je voulais aussi remplacer la hausse supérieure des deux ruches par des neuves car celles en place ont besoin d'un coup de peinture. Tout s'est bien passé avec la ruche nord. Dans la ruche sud, tout allait bien jusqu'à ce que je remarque deux cellules non opercullées contenant des nymphes mortes. Je les ai extraites avec une alumette. Elles étaient noires et mouillées. J'ai ensuite cassé l'opercule de quelques cellules et j'en ai trouvé plusieurs qui contenaient quelque chose s'apparentant à de la boue. En approchant mon nez très près de ces cellule je remarquais une odeur de décomposition. Cela m'a fait penser que cette ruche a peut être la loque mais les restes d'abeilles mortes n'avaient pas l'aspect glaireux décrit dans les livres. J'ai fait tout ce que j'avais prévu de faire et j'ai refermé.

18 Mars 2007
Aujourd'hui, j'ai vérifié les deux ruches. J'ai nettoyé les planches d'envole. Il y avait beaucoup d'abeilles mortes dans la ruche sud mais les deux ruches ont l'air d'aller bien. La ruche nord a une population très forte. J'ai vu du couvain dans les deux ruches et dans la ruche nord j'ai vu la reine. Puisque, comme je m'y attendais, le couvain était dans les hausses du haut j'ai échangé les deux hausses dans les deux ruches. J'ai donné du sirop que j'avais de reste de l'automne dernier et j'ai placé des bandes d'apistan dans les deux ruches.

24 Fevrier 2007
Ce matin j'ai téléphoné a Jone's Bee Company pour commander des abeilles pour commencer une troisième ruche. D'après ce que je peux entendre dans les deux ruches, j'ai l'impression qu'elles vont bien et donc un seul paquet d'abeilles devrait suffir. Nous sommes en suite allés acheter de l'apret et de la peinture et nous nous sommes tous mis à peindre la nouvelle ruche.

9 Fevrier 2007
Je passe de temps en temps coller mon oreille contre les ruches. Tout semble aller bien malgré le froid que nous avons eu. Il y a quelques abeilles mortes enface de la ruche sud. Au printemps je vais démarer une troisième ruch. Je viens de recevoir deux corps de ruche et deux hausses avec tous les cadres et la base, la planche d'envole et les couvercles de Mann Lake Ltd. pour $170. Cette fois j'ai pris des cadres entièrement en plastique. Pour $20 j'ai aussi achete un abreuvoir (en plastique lui aussi) et une grille aératrice (en bois) pour placer juste au dessus de la planche d'envole. Avant la fin du mois il faut que je commande des abeilles. Je ne sais pas si je vais prendre une ou deux boites.

29 Octobre 2006
J'ai enlevé l'apistan des deux ruches. La ruche sud a du sirop de reste et je n'en ai donc pas ajouté. J'en ai donné a la ruche nord. J'ai donné un dernier tratement de tetracycline au deux ruches. J'ai pu voir du couvain dans les cadres de la ruche nord. Je n'en ai pas vu dans la ruche sud mais je n'ai pas vé rifié dans la boite du bas.

22 October 2006
J'ai done de la tetracycline aux deux ruches.

15 Octobre 2006
Tout le sucre et la tetracycline ont disparu et j'ai donc donné traitement aux deux ruches. Il y a un peu de condensation sous le toit. Il faudrait que j'ameliore la ventilation. Je n'avai pas de sirop prêt.

6 Octobre 2006
J'ai donné du sirop et un premier traitement de tetracycline aux deux ruches. Il ne faisait pas chaud alors je n'ai pas voulu passer trop de temps à inspecter les cadres mais j'ai quand même pu voir de beaux cadres de couvain dans la ruche nord. Dans la ruche sud je n'ai pas trouvé de couvain dans la boite du haut qui est pleine de miel. Je n'ai pas regardé dans celle du bas. La ruche sud semble forte avec plus d'abeilles que dans la ruche nord. Dans les deux ruches les abeilles m'ont semblé particulièrement calme.

25 Septembre 2006
Nora m'a dit que les abeilles sont revenu là où j'ai nettoyé les cadres hier. Elles n'étaient pas aussi nombreuses et elles ne sont pas restée lontemps mais elle avaient clairement enregistré l'évenement.

24 Septembre 2006
Aujourd'hui, j'ai eu une mauvaise idée. Je voulai nettoyer mes cadres et je ne voulais pas le faire à la maison à cause de tout le propolis que j'avais à gratter. Je me suis donc instalé dans le jardin, devant la maison. J'ai trouver quelque mites a cire et il faudra donc que je congèle tout les cadres. Au début, tout allait bien mais petit à petit, j'ai commencé à me trouver entourer par un nombre croissant d'abeilles et de guèpes. J'&etait en face de la maison, en pleine vue de la rue, dans un nuage d'abeilles. J'ai fini par devoir secouer chaque cadre un par un pour en enlever les abeilles avant de le replacer dans une boite sous un chiffon. Je me suis fait piquer quatre fois. Je l'ai bien merité. Je ne le referai plus. Promis!

23 Septembre 2006
Aujourd'hui je voulais inspecter les ruches et je pensais que je déplacerai un cadres d'oeufs de la ruche nord vers l'autre qui n'a plus de reine. Dès que j'ai ouvert la ruche nord, j'ai pu voir que les abeilles avait l'air saine et contente. Apres avoir inspecté quelques cadres j'ai trouve de grandes surfaces couvertes de couvain sous opercule. Il y a une reine et elle s'est mise a pondre il y a au moins 9 jours. J'ai donée un gallon de sirop a chaque ruche. J'ai instalé un reducteur d'entrée et des cales entre les corps de ruche pour améliorer la ventilation.

10 Septembre 2006
Aujourd'hui j'ai enlevé les hausses de la ruche sud. Les abeilles ont bien nettoye les cadres et ont commencé à les remplir. L'année prochaine je ne leur rendrai les cadres que pour trois jours. J'ai placé deux bandes d'apistan dans le corps de ruche du bas et ai installe l'abreuvoir avec un gallon de sirop. J'ai inspecté la ruche nord. Toujours pas d'oeufs et plus de couvain. Je leur ai malgrè tout mis deux bande d'apistan et un gallon de sirop. J'imagine que si des oeufs n'aparaissent pas la semaine prochaine cette ruche est perdue.

4 Septembre 2006
J'ai re-placé les hausses sur la ruche sud et ai enlevé celle de la ruche nord. Je l'ai remplacé par l'abreuvoir avec un demi gallon de sirop epais. Je ne sais pas trop ce que je devrai faire avec cette ruche.

3 Septembre 2006
Nous avons passé l'après midi à tourner la manivelle de l'extracteur. Nous avons obtenu quelque chose comme 70 livres de miel.

2 Septembre 2006
Aujourd'hui, nous avons enlevé les hausses avec l'aide de quelques copains. Nous avons commencé par regarder dans la ruche nord. La population semble forte et il n'y a pas de traces de mites à cire. Le probleme est qu'il n'y a plus de reine. Nous avons vu quelques cellules de couvain desquelles de jeunes abeille sortaient et il semble donc que la reine a disparue au temps de ma dernière visite, il y a trois semaines. Nous avons vu plusieurs (~8) cellules de reine vides. La hausse est vide, pas de surprise. Nous avons pris les trois hausses de l'autre ruche. Les enfants &etaient les premiers a gouter le miel de cette année. Les abeilles ont commencé à enlever le miel des cadres les plus bas. Nous aurions mieux fait de faire la récolte une semaine plus tôt.

13 Aout 2006
J'ai ajouté une hausse sur la ruche sud sans vérifier à l'interieur. Apr&egraev;s avoir inspecté la ruche nord, j'ai décidé d'y ajouter une hausse aussi.

6 Aout 2006
J'ai regardé les ruches. Rien de special. Dans la ruche Nord, j'ai encore trouvé quelque cocons de mites à cire. Ils ont probablement été fait par des larves qui étaient dans les cadres et que je n'ai pas vu à ma dernière visite.

Juillet 2006
Dans la ruche sud, la dernierre hausse est presque pleine. Dans le corp de ruche superieur, j'ai vu des cellules de drones. Pour ameliorer la circulation d'air, j'ai enlevé le réducteur d'entrée. C'est quelque chose que j'aurai du faire il y a lontemps. Dans la ruche nord, j'ai eu la deception de trouver quelque cocons de mites a cire sur l'un des cadres du corp de ruche superieur. Les abeilles semblaient très agitées autour des cocons. J'ai décidé de regarde la planche d'envole où j'ai été surpris de trouver une masse de cocons et de larves que les abeilles attaquaient. Je n'avais pas mon apareil photo. Je pense qu'il y avait quelque chose comme une centaine de larves. Je ne savais pas que les mites à cire pouvaient faire des nids comme ca. J'ai enlevé tout ¸a et j'imagine que cela va rendre la vie des abeilles plus facile. Cette ruche ne va cependant pas nous donner du miel cette année. Le corp de ruche inferieur contient beaucoup d'oeufs, de larves et de couvain.

9 Juillet 2006
Dans la ruche nord, tout a l'air bien. Le coté d'un cadre de la boite du haut est couvert d'oeufs et les abeilles occupent tous les cadres. Dans la ruches sud les abeilles sont occupées à nettoyer les cadres de la dernière hausee.

4 Juillet 2006
J'ai donné un gallon de sirop à la ruche nord.

2 Juillet 2006
Dans la ruche sud, tout le couvain que j'avai remarqué en bas des cadres de la première hausse a &eacut;té remplacé par du miel. Les deux hausses sont d'ailleurs presque pleines et j'en ai donc rajouté une.Dans la ruche nord, pas de traces de mites à cire, beaucoup d'oeufs, de jeunes larves et de couvain et j'ai donc installé un second corp de ruche.Je devrais leur donner du sirop. Dans cette ruche, le réducteur d'entrée est toujours sur la plus petite ouverture.

18 Juin 2006
La ruche sud a beaucou de couvain. La reine pond même au bas des cadres de la première hausse. J'ai ajouté une hausse. Dans la ruche nord tout a l'air bien mieux que la dernière fois mais sur le dernier cadre, j'ai quand même trouvé un couple de larves de mites à cire et j'ai donc décidé de ne pas rendre aux abeilles le second corp de ruche.

4 Juin 2006
La ruche sud n'a pas beaucoup changé depuis la dernière fois. Peut être un peu plus de couvain dans la ruche et de miel dans les hausses. Dans la ruche nord, c'est une grosse deception. Les abeilles semblent aller bien mais des zones de rayons détruits et occupés par les mites a cire. J'ai mis au congelateur les trois cadres en plus mauvais état. Je les ai remplacé par les cadres que j'avai précedement congelé. J'ai vu une vaintaine de larves. Elles etaient concentrée dans de très petites régions. Sur les cadres que j'ai laissé je n'ai vu aucune trace de mites. On verra la semaine prochaine. J'ai bien vu des oeufs.

28 Mai 2006
La ruche sud semble bien mais pas beaucoup de progrès dans la hausse. Les deux cadres de fondations que h;ai installe n'ont pas progressé ce qui est surprenant en comparaison avec le niveau d'activité dans le reste de la ruche où il y a vraiment beaucoup de couvain. La ruche nord semble maintenant aller bien. Il y a des cadres de couvain et la population est vraiment plus forte. Pierre Colin était avec moi et a pris quelques photos: 1, 2, 3, 4.

21 Mai 2006
La ruche sud va très bien. C'est ettonant de voir ces cadres entierrement couverts de couvain des deux côtés. Les abeilles n'ont cependant pas commencé à vraiment travailer dans la hausse. La ruche nord ne va pas bien. Elle se débat toujours avec des mites à cire et il n'y a pas énormément de coubvain. Il faudrait probablement que je remplace la reine. Je vais me renseigner dans cette direction cette semaine. Afin d'ssayer d'ameliorer les choses maintenant, j'ai enlevé les cinq cadres qui semblent le plus mal en point. Je pensais remplacer ces cinq cadres par cinq de ceux que j'ai congelés il y a deux semaines. Mais j'ai remarqué que toutes les abeilles de cette ruche peuvent tenir sur trois cadres seulement. Cela me semble être une population bien faible et j'ai décidé de prendre deux de ces cadres couverts de couvain dans la ruche sude et de les placer dans la ruche nord. Je me dis que cela devrait gonfler la population de ma ruche nord tout en limitant un peu le developement explosif de la ruche sud. J'espère seulement que je n'ai pas blaissé la reine quand j'enlevai toutes les abeilles sur les cadres de couvain. J'ai remplacé les deux cadres que j'ai pris par des cadres neufs avec des fondations en platique. Je n'ai plus qu'à attendre la semaine prochaine pour avoir une idée de l'effet qu'aura eu cette manipulation.

15 May 2006
Aujourd'hui, en rentrant du travail, j'ai enlevé la mangeoire de la ruche sud et j'ai instalé une hausse. A la même aucasion, j'ai remarqué que, la semaine dernière; j'avai oublié de replacer les bandes d'apistan dans la ruche nord. J'ai donc mis les quatres bandes que j'ai dans la ruche nord.

14 Mai 2006
La ruche nord semble aller mieux maintenant. Il y a du couvain et j'ai l'impression que la population s'accroît. Il semble aussi que les abeilles ont commencé à enlever les toiles formées par les larves de mites a cire. J'ai ai enleve aussi avec mon outil et j'ai quand m≖me trouve deux larves qui étaient toujours vivantes. J'ai nettoyé la mangeoire et remis du sirop. La ruche sud est en pleine forme. Il y a beaucoup de couvain en bas et ¸a commence en haut. Il n'y a plus beaucoup de place et j'ai vu une coupelle de cire au bas d'un cadre du rez de chaussée. Il va falloir que j'ajoute un hausse bientôt et je n'ai donc pas remis l'apistan.

7 Mai 2006
Je n'étais pas inquiet au sujet de la ruche sud car j'avais remarqué une bonne activité aux entrées en haut et en bas. Dès que j'ai ouvert la ruche j'ai pu voir que la reine a été libérée et aprè avoir regardé quelques cadres, j'ai trouve de jeunes larves. Les abeilles ont tout mangé le papier entre les deux boites.Comme la reine m'a semble se trouver dans la boite superieure, j'ai echangé les deux boites. J'ai rajouté un peu de sirop. Tout semble d'aller bien. La ruche nord est bien différente. Dans la boite supérieure, j'ai vu de ces tunnels creusés par les larves de mites a cire et j'ai même vu deux mites qui marchaient sure les cadres que j'inspectais. Les mites semblent concentrée dans la boite superieure où il y a moins d'abeilles. J'ai donc décidé d'enlever la boite supérieure et de congeler tous ses cadres. J'ai quand même vu quelques larves. Je n'ai pas rajouté de sirop.

30 Avril 2006
Hier, Nora est allée chercher les abeilles que j'ai commendées. Ce soir, après être revenu de Tucson, j'ai ouvert la ruche sud. J'y ai trouvé quelques larves et donc la situation semble s'améliorer un peu. J'ai trouvé la reine et l'ai enlevée avec deux abeilles. L'une d'essle avait un mite varoa. Ensuite, j'ai enlevé toutes le abeilles de tous les cadres de la boite superieure. Apres avoir nettoyé je l'ai remise en place avec une feuille de journal la séparant de celle du bas. J'ai ensuite remis en place cinq cadre et vide la boite d'abeilles dans l'espace restant avant d'installer quatre cadres suplementaire avec precautions. J'ai ensuite suspendu entre deux cadres la reine dans sa cage avec un bouchon de chamallow. J'ai remis la mangeoire avec un gallon de syrop et une calle sous le toit de fa¸on à ce que les abeilles puissent sortir et rentrer en attendant qu'elles rejoignent celles du rez de chaussée.

23 Avril 2006
J'ai rendu visite aux abeilles aujourd'hui. Dans la ruche sud, je n'ai pas vu une seule mite. Je n'ai pas vu de larves ni d'oeufs non-plus. Dans la ruche nord, j'ai vu quelques larves mais toutes très evoluées. Il est possible que les deux reines aient cessé de pondre sous l'influence du mauvais temps que nous avons eu il y a une semaine. Dans les deux ruches il y avait quelques abeilles mortes dans leurs cellules (dont quelques drones dans la ruche nord). Dans les deux ruches, les abeilles ne semblent pas avoir utilisé beaucoup de sirop.

8 Avril 2006
Aujourd'hui, il faisait suffisement beau pour jeter un coup d'oeuil dans les ruches. La ruche sud n'a pas l'air bien. Je n'ai pu trouver ni larve ni couvain. Les abeilles n'on toujours pas consomé leur traitement à la tetracycline. Dans la ruche nord, je n'ai pas vu d'oeufs mais j'ai vu des larves jeunes et quelques cellules de drones. Dans les deux ruches, j'ai vu de nombreuses abeilles mortes dans leur cellule. Ici et là il y a du moisi. Le sirop dans la mangeoire a fermenté. Je l'ai donc jeté, et, après avoir rincé les mangeoires, j'ai partagé un gallon de sirop entre les deux ruches.

5 Mars 2006
Nous avons acheté des bandes d'apistan contre les varoas et je les ai placées dans les ruches. Dans la ruche sud j'ai encore pu voir des mites mais j'ai aussi vu des larves. Cela veut dire que j'ai une reine et qu'elle pond! La situation n'est donc pas aussi désespérée que je le pensais mais il y a quand même bien peu d'abeilles.

26 Février 2006
Ce weekend était superbe et donc, hier j'ai préparé du syrop (10 livres de sucre pour 5 gallons d'eau) et cet après-midi, par une température de plus de 60F ou 15C j'ai inspecté les ruches. Les deux ruches sont couvertes de crottes, surtout la ruche sud. La ruche sud semble aussi être beaucoup moins active que la nord. A l'entrée de la ruche nord, j'ai pu voir plusieurs abeilles revenir avec leurs pattes arrières chargées de polen. Je ne sais pas ou elles ont pu trouver ça à cette saison. Il y a aussi beaucoup plus d'abeilles mortes par terre en face de la ruche nord que en face de la ruche sud. A l'intérieur de la ruche sud, cela n'a pas l'air daller très bien. Je n'ai pas pu trouver une seule cellule de couvain ni un seul oeuf. Le nombre d'abeilles semble aussi très faible. Il y a encore beaucoup de miel et de polen en stock. J'ai remarqué plusieurs abeilles avec les ailes mal formées ainsi que trois abeilles avec une varoa sur le dos. Je n'ai pas vu un seul drone. Dans la ruche nord tout a l'air d'aller bien mieux. J'ai vu des cellules de couvain, je n'ai pas vu d'oeufs mais le ciel était couvert et ils n'auraient pas été facile à voir. Je n'ai pas remarqué de varoas ni d'abeilles avec les ailes déformées. Il y a aussi beaucoup d'abeilles. Dans les deux ruches, j'ai nettoyé la planche d'envol et l'aérateur. La ruche sud avait beaucoup d'abeilles mortes. C'est peut être la raison pour laquelle les abeilles ont créé une ouverture au-dessus du reducteur d'entrée. Dans les deux ruches, il y avait plus d'abeilles dans la hausse du haut et j'ai donc échangé les deux boites. Dans les deux ruches j'ai sepoudré une poignée de mon mélange de sucre et de tetracycline et j'ai versé un gallon de syrop dans la mangeoire après l'avoir nettoyée. Cette semaine, il faut que j'achette des bandes d'apistan contre les varoas et que je parle aux gents de Jones bee company pour savoir quoi faire avec ma ruche sud. Je pense qu'elle est foutue et qu'il va falloir que j'obtienne une boite d'abeilles avec une renne pour recommencer.

12 Octobre 2005
Aujourd'hui j'ai encore donné 3 gallons de sirop entre les deux ruches.

9 Octobre 2005
Hier soir j'ai préparé du sirop épais et aujourd'hui j'ai partagé les 3 gallons que j'ai obtenus entre les deux ruches. Ce soir, je suis allé regarder et les mangeoires étaient presque sèche!

8 Octobre 2005
Ce matin j'ai donné aux abeilles leur troisième et dernière dose de tetracycline. Elles sortent toujours pour travailler. J'en ai vu plusieurs revenir leurs paniers chargés de polen. Les mangeoires sont vides, il faut que je prépare du sirop.

5 Octobre 2005
Ce matin, j'ai partagé un gallon et demi de surop entre les deux ruches.

4 Octobre 2005
Ce matin il faisait froid et il pleuvait. J'ai décidé d'instaler un reducteur d'entrée devant chaque ruche. Dans la soirée j'ai vérifié les cadres de hausses et j'ai encore trouvé des mites. J'ai retiré les cadres du congélateur et je les ai mis dans un sac poubelle pour les proteger et les ai remplacé par une dizaine de cadres sur lesquels j'ai vu des traces de mites.

24 Septembre 2005
J'ai donnée aux abeilles une seconde dose de tetracycline. J'ai vérifié les cadres de hausses et j'y ai trouvé quelques mites. J'ai retiré les mites et ai placé cadre au congelateur. Il va falloir que je fasse cela pour tout les cadres.

14 Septembre 2005
Ce soir j'ai enlevé le couvercle interieur des ruches et les ai remplacés par les mangeoires. J'ai versé un gallon de sirop épais dans chaque mangeoire (6 litres d'eau pour 20 livres de sucre). Avant de mettre les mangeoires en place j'ai sepoudré une poignée de sucre glace mélangé à de la tetracycline sur le haut des cadres. Il faudra que je fasse cela encore dans 10 jours et puis encore une fois dix jours plus tard. Je n'ai pas utilisé moi enfumoir et je pense que cela aurait été mieux si j'avais poussé les abeilles avant de sepoudrer le sucre et la tetracycline.

11 Septembre 2005
Je pense que c'est aujourd'hui que j'ai placé des bandes d'apistan contre les mites varoa. Je devrais toujours prendre note de ce que je fais le jour même. J'ai placé deux bandes dans chaque ruche au premier etage. Il faudra que je pense à les enlever avant le 30 Octobre.

10 Septembre 2005
Nora est allée à une classe pour apprendre a faire de la crème pour la peau à Jone's Bees. J'étais de garde au stand de la Wasatch Beekeeper Association à la Utah State Fair de 10 heures du matin à 2 heures de l'après midi.

5 Septembre 2005
J'ai enlevé les hausses des ruches. Les alvéoles qui ont été nettoyées par les abeilles sont vraiment propres. Mai au lieu de déplacer tout le miel vers le corp de ruche, elles ont tout rassemblé dans de petites regions dans le tiers superieur de chaque cadre.

2 Septembre 2005
Les quelques derniers jours ont été passés à filtrer le miel que nous n'avions pas pu filtrer le jour de l'extraction. En tout nous avons 15 bidons de 5 livres, 20 bouteilles de 2 livres et un nombre uncertain de pots de 1 livre. Filtrer a pris beaucoup plus de temps que nous nous y attendions. L'année prochaine, j'imagine qu'il faudra que nous installions un chauffage dans la piece o%ugrave nous extractons pour rendre le miel plus fluide. Comme nous avions fini, il fallait nettoyer. Le miel part facilement mais la cire est souvent difficile à enlever. Nous avons aussi rincé le miel des opercules avec de l'eau chaude. Nous avons fait fondre la cire et l'avons versé dans une bouteille en carton pour obtenir une brique.

30 Aout 2005
Aujourd'hui j'ai replacé les hausses dans l'espoire que les abeilles récupererons le miel qui y reste.

August 28th 2005
This after noon was dedicated to extractingthe honey, so I decided I would inspect the hives body around noon to check the amount of honey. In each hive I counted something like 5 frames covered both sides with honey, a lotof pollen and surprisingly a lot of brood. In the north hive, there was what I think is a superceeding queen cell. It was a queen cell that was at one third from the bottom of the frame. I decided not to cut it out and let them do their business. I hope that is not a mistake. The bees are clearly lacking space or maybe do they have difficulty maintaining the temperature low enoughL they spend a lot of time at the entrance, especially in the north hive. Extraction is a mess, every thing get sticky, honey and wax get every where but it was a good time. Many friends stopped by to help cranking and uncaping. In the evening when we stopped we still had to go through one super. We did it on the following evening.

August 27th 2005
I have been away since the end of July and I think that now is time to get the honey out. This afternoon a friend came over to help. One was taking the frames out one by one, shaking the bees out, pass the frame to the other a few steps away for him to store it in a spare super and cover every thing with a piece of cloth after making sure no bees came along. It went rather smoothly and only took one hour for each hive.

July 24th 2005
Today, as I approached the hives, a bee just flew to my face and stung me on the cheek. I suspect this resulted from my garlic smell as I had a lot of garlic on the previous day. I checked the top of the north hive and there was no need to add a super. Then I checked the south hive and found nice frames of capped honey in the three first shallows and not much done yet in the forth one. In the top hive body I was able to see frames of eggs and brood and as I tried to show larvae to a friend I simply dropped a frame on the ground. The bees did not like it. I put every thing back and watched the bees walk back home.

July 17th 2005
I opened the north hive. Not much work has been done in the third super. The two other supers are getting capped. The bees are still messy which makes me spend a lot of time with them with the wive open. When I started inspecting the upper hive body they became really agressive. I received four or five stings on my right hand and they were flying to my face trying to discourge me from bothering them. They won and I was soon putting every thing back together after having seen a couple of frames with honey and brood. I did not have time to check for eggs. In the south hive I only gave a look at the top super which is full. I decided to give them one more super (it now has four!) and did not go look deeper in the boxes.

July 10th 2005
I have been away for the week and Nora went to Jone's bee for me to get two more supers in case the bees kept working as fast as before my last visit. After putting them together I looked at both hives very quickly, just checking the upper shallow. The north hive has filled it's second super and I decided to give it a third one. The south hive has not been progressing much on its third one. On each frame only the central region is fully drawn and contains a little honey. I'll give both hives a full inspection next week.

July 3rd 2005
We looked at the south hive with Lucy. The top super is full and I clearly need to add one more. That is only 8 days since I gave them that box! It is a good thing I got two yesterday. The rest of the hive looks fine and I was able to find eggs. There are still less drone cells in this hive than in the north one. This evening we also melted the wax I have collected since the beginning.

2 Juillet
Ce matin je suis allé chez Jone's bee company pour y acheter deux hausses. Après avoir assemblé et peint les hausses et assemblé les cadres, j'ai ouvert la ruche nord. Là les abeilles n'ont pas fait beaucoup de progrès dans la hausse supérieure donc je ne leur en ajouterai pas une aujourd'hui. Dans la première hausse, la plus grande partie du miel est sous opercule. Dans les corps de ruche j'ai pu voir des oeufs ainsi que de beaux cadres de couvain. Les abeilles sont toujours indisciplinées mais les choses se présentent nettement mieux qu'il y a trois semaines.

27 Juin
Il y a quelque abeilles mortes sur le sol en face de la ruche. Ce soir j'ai remarqué une petite guèpe occupée les têtes de cadavres pour sucer l'interieur de leur torax. Plusieurs fois je l'ai aussi vu s'envoler en tranportant une tête. Ensuite j'ai remarqué une fourmi minuscule qui trainait un absomen d'abeille découpé par la guèpe.

26 Juin
Aujourd'hui, j'ai ouvert le ruche nord. La hausse est presque plein de rayons remplis de miel. Les corps de la ruches sont toujours difficile a manipuler et j'ai du endomager un cadre plein de miel sous opercule. Les abeilles continuent de construire des rayons qui connectent les cadres ensemble. J'ai recu ma première piqure. J'ai remarqué d'important groupes de cellules de drones. Je ne me souvient pas avoir vu la même chose dans l'autre ruche. J'ai ajouté une hausse sur cette ruche aussi.

25 Juin
Cette après midi le temps a varié entre orageux et ensoleillé. Vers 17 heures, il faisait suffisement bon et j'ai décidé de rendre visite aux abeilles. J'ai fait de gros efforts pour bien préparer mon enfumoir avec du fuel special que j'avai recu avec et pour la première fois ca a bien marché. J'ai ouvert la ruche sud. J'ai été bien surptis de voir que tous les cadres de la hausse que j'ai ajouté il y a 10 jours sont couvert de rayonnages complets remplis de miel. Le miel n'est pas encore sous opercule mais il n'y a déjà plus de place. Il était donc clair qu'il fallait que j'ajoute une hausse. Dans les deux boites du corps de la ruche j'ai trouvé des oeufs, des larves, du miel sous opercule, et du pollen. Il y avait très peu de cire à enlever et seulement une ou deux de ces cellules sphériques pointant vers le bas. Tout semble pour le mieux. Alors qu'il commencait à pleuvoir, j'ai ajouté une hausse. Je n'ai pas pu ouvrir la ruche nord. J'ai remarqué que au crépuscule, quelques heures après que j'ai mis un super sur la ruche sud, il n'y avait plus d'abeilles à l'entrée de la ruche sud alors qu'il y en avait beaucoup à l'entrée de celle du nord. Je vais manquer de hausses, il faut donc que j'en achette. Il faut aussi que je commence à me renseigner sur l'achat d'un extracteur et du materiel périphérique nécessaire à la récolte du miel.

18 Juin
Aujourd'hui, pour la première fois depuis Mardi, je n'ai plus de propolis sur les doigt. Cela fait plus propres mais l'agréable odeur est partie elle aussi. La poignée de la porte de la cuisine est toujours un peu collante.

15 Juin 2005
Je crois qu'aujourd'hui j'ai fait ma première bétise: j'ai décidé d'inspecter la ruche nord avant d'aller au travail. Il était 9 heures et il y avait bien trop d'abeilles encore à la maison. La ruche nord est moins avancée que la sud. Deux cadres ne sont toujours pas utilisés dans la boite du haut. Il y a beaucoup de couvain et peu de miel sous opercule. C'est probablement lié au fait que les abeilles ont construit beacoup de rayons anarchiques. Les rayons sont fortement renflés au bas des cadres et il m'a été impossible de les enlever et le remettre sans les endomager et écraser de trop nombreuses abeilles. La situation était compliquée d'avantage par mon enfumoir qui ne faisait que s'éteindre. Dans la bagare avec l'enfumoir j'ai même fini par mettre le feu à la table de picnic. Notre voisine était là pour éteindre l'incendi. C'était une visite stressante. Il y avait beaucoup de cellules ouvertes vers le bas. Je pense avoir retiré une bonne livre d'un mélange de cire et de larves. Mon outils était recouvert du sang laiteux des larves que je tuai. Apres avoir inspecté l'étage inférieur; j'ai remis la boite du haut en place avec de nombreuses abeilles accrochées en dessous. Je pense en avoir blaisser beaucoup là encore. J'espere que la reine est saine et sauve et que la colonie s'en remetra rapidement. Je n'ai pas eu une seule piqure alors que j'en méritais quelques une. Je n'ai pas remis la mangeoire sur cette ruche non plus et j'ai ajouté une hausse. Je vérifirai les deux ruches en début de semaine prochaine. On m'a dit que les essaims sont maintenant peu vraissemblable car il est déjà tard dans la saison.

14 Juin 2005
J'ai été longtemps absent. J'ai enlevé les réducteurs d'entrée des deux ruches. Ce soir vers 18 heures j'ai ouvert la ruche sud. Aussitôt j'ai eu l'impression que les abeilles manquaient d'espace: elles avaient commencé à construire des rayons dans la mangeoire. Dans la boite du haut, tout les cadres sont maintenant utilisé. Je commence même à avoir du miel sous opercule. Il y a un cadre qui en est couvert sur un côté. C'était vraiment difficile de sortir les cadres car tout est maintenant collé avec du propolis. Si bien que je n'ai pas pu prendre de photos sans en recouvrir tout mon apareil photo. Sur l'un des cadres il y avait une zone pas belle recouvrant une vingtaine de cellules. Je n'ai rien senti mais j'ai quand même décidé d'enlever la cire. Le couvain y semblait normal. Les cadres centraux étaient renflé à la base avec de grosses cellules sphériques ouvertes vers le bas. Cela ne ressemble pas aux cellules royales que j'ai vu dans les livres mais je les ai enlevé suspectant qu'elles soient une indication du désire croissant que les abeilles doivent avoir de faire un essaim en conséquence de mon retard a leur fournir l'espace dont elles ont besoin. Dans la boite du bas, j'ai été surpris de trouver deux cadres non encore utilisés. J'ai décidé d'échanger les deux boites. Elles sont maintenant lourdes et difficiles à déplacer. Je n'ai pas remis la mangeoire et j'ai installé une hausse sans grille de séparation de la reine. J'espère que cela leur donnera suffisement d'espace pour quelques temps au moins. Je me débrouille toujours aussi mal avec l'enfumoir qui est toujours eteint quand j'en ai besoin. Le miel dans les rayons recupérés dans la mangeoire est délicieux.

20 Mai 2005
J'ai ouvert la ruche aujourd'hui avec un peu d'appréhension mai tout semble être au mieux. Les abeilles ont beaucoup travaillé depuis la dernière fois. Elles utilisent maintenant les deux boites pour le couvain et les réserves. Dans chaque boite il n'y a pas plus de 5 cadres sur lesquels elles n'ont pas construit de profonds rayonnages. Je pense qu'il faudra que je mette des boites à miel au dessus de chaque ruche. Ce sera dans presque 3 semaine puisque je vais m'absenter. Dans la ruche du nord il y avait un rayonnage anarchique qui contenait des larves. J'ai dû le détruire. J'étais un peu surpris de voir une rangée de cellules bombées au bas d'un cadre. Elles ne pendent pas et il doit donc s'agir de cellules de drones. Je suis toujours étoné par la gamme de couleurs des pollens. J'ai remarqué quelques abeilles vibrer de haut en bas sur leurs pattes pour de courtes périodes de temps. Je pense que c'est l'une des dances de communication. J'essaierai de faire un film la prochaine fois. Je me débrouille toujours aussi mal avec l'enfumoir. Les mangeoires étaient vides et j'ai partagé 2/3 d'un gallon entre les deux ruches.

8 Mai 2005
C'était peut être un peu tôt après la dernière visite mais je pars en voyage pour dix jours et j'ai donc décidé de jeter un oeil avant de partir. C'est peut être une bonne chose. Dans la boite du haut de la ruche du sud j'ai compté quelque chose comme cinq cadres utilisés à plus du tiers pour du miel. Sur le montant de l'un des cadres nous avons remarqué du moisi. Première cause d'inquiétude. Cela résulte probablement de la pluie et d'une mauvaise ventilation. Les abeilles n'ont pas eu suffisament de temps pour construire des rayons là où il ne faut pas mais elles y travaillent. Dans la boite du bas, de nombreuses cellules de couvée étaient vides et de jeunes abeilles ont dû en sortir. J'ai eu du mal à trouver des oeufs. Il y a aussi des larves. Dans la ruche du nord, trois cadres de la boite du haut sont utilisés pour du miel à plus du tiers. Dans la boite du bas, à peut près de même que dans la ruche du sud, un couple de cadres sont utilisés pour du miel et trois ou quatre sont utilisés pour la couvée avec au centre de nombreuses alvéoles ouvertes et vides. Là j'ai vraiment eu du mal à trouver des oeufs. J'en ai quand même trouvé mais cela m'inquiète. Ce qui m'a vraiment inquiété, ça a été de voir 3 abeilles produire un volume de crotte énorme, de couleur jaune à brun. C'était à l'extérieur de la ruche, à l'intérieur tout était très propre. Cela me fait quand même penser à la dyssentrie. Afin d'améliorer l'aération, j'ai élargi l'entrée et j'ai placé une alumette entre la mangeoire et la boite du haut. On verra comment ça va à mon retour dans une dizaine de jours.

5 Mai 2005
Pendant la dernière visite j'ai remarqué que les mangeoires étaient vides. Hier soir j'ai préparé su sirop et ce soir vers 11 heures je suis allé aux ruches pour refaire le plein. Jai soulevé le toit de la ruche du nord, enlevé les rayons laissés là la dernière fois et versé du sirop. J'ai remarqué que les abeilles étaient attirées par ma lumière et commençaient à monter. J'ai donc refermé en vitesse. Dans la ruche du sud, je n'ai même pas eu le temps d'enlever les rayons que les abeilles commençaient à monter. J'imagine que les abeilles restent plus actives la nuit à cause de la température plus élevée (13 degrés à 11h du soir).

3 Mai 2005
Deuxième visite. Les deux ruches sont à peu près semblables. Il y avait beaucoup de rayons anarchiques et certains cadres étaient collés ensemble. Les rayons que j'ai enlevés étaient utilisés surtout pour du miel et je les ai placés dans les mangeoires afin que les abeilles les nettoient. Dans les deux ruches l'activité est concentrée dans la boite du bas. Il y a beaucoup d'alvéoles de couvée (brood en englais) sur les deux cadres centraux. J'ai pu voir des oeufs dans les alveoles autour de la couvée et des larves en bas des cadres. Les cadres un peu plus loin du centre sont utilisés pour du miel de même que les cadres au centre dans la boite supérieure surtout dans celle du nord. La prochaine fois il faudra que je mesure plus précisement la surface utilisée par la couvée et par le miel. Une fois de plus mon enfumoir s'est éteint. Il faut vraiment que je fasse des progrès là-dessus. En attendant le chat est interessé.

23 Avril 2005
Aujourd'huil nous avons rendu visite aux abeilles pour la première fois depuis leur installation. J'ai procédé de la même façon pour les deux ruches. J'ai commencé par enfumer l'entrée et puis en dessous du couvercle. J'ai ensuite placé le courvercle à l'envers sur le sol et par dessus j'ai posé la mangeoire. J'ai commencé avec la ruche sud (celle de gauche sur les photos). Il n'y avait pas beaucoup d'activité dans la boite du haut que j'ai donc placée sur la mangeoire à côté de la ruche. Là, j'ai vu que le shamallow ne bouchait plus la cage de la reine. Bonne nouvelle! Dans l'espace ou j'avais placé la reine, les abeilles avaient construit des rayons. J'ai donc sorti le cadre pour enlever ces rayons. Avec Louis, nous avons pu voir qu'un oeuf était au fond de chaque alvéole. Nous avons ensuite regardé d'autres cadres. J'ai remarqué quelques zones où la cire est de couleur brune. La prochaine fois je prendrai des photos en gros plan. Nous avons ensuite tout remis en place. Il faut que j'apprenne à mieux utiliser l'enfumeur qui sétait éteint. Nous nous sommes ensuite occupé de la seconde ruche. Là c'était comme je m'y attendais après avoir écouté la ruche: les abeilles étaients toute dans la boite du haut. J'ai décidé d'échanger les deux boites. J'ai donné la boite du haut à Louis et j'ai enlevé celle du bas. Nous avons pu voir que la reine était bien sortie. Ensuite j'ai repris la boite du haut et je l'ai mise à la place de celle du bas et nous avons pu inspecter quelques cadres. Commes les abeilles étaient installées dans la boite du haut où les cadres étaient régulièrement espacés, il n'y avait pas de rayons à enlever. Nous avons pu voir un oeuf dans chaque alvéole et tout avait l'air d'aller bien. Je pense que la ruche du nord était plus avancée que celle du sud. Nous avons ensuite tout remis en place. Les abeilles semblent vraiment très dociles, nous n'avons pas eu une seule piqûre et elles sont restées bien calmes pendant toute l'inspection. Moins d'un de,i)heure après que nous ayons fini, l'activité au dehors de la ruche semblait être normale. Le matin suivant, avant que les abeilles ne se reveillent, j'ai rajouté du sirop dans les deux mangeoires.

21 Avril 2005

Depuid le 18 il fait gris froid et pluvieux. Les abeilles ne sortent pas. Ce matin j'ai rapidement soulevé le toit des ruches pour reremplir leur mangeoir de sirop.


17 Avril 2005
Ce matin nous étions un peu inquiet car il n'y avait pas signe de beaucoup d'activité a l'entrée des ruches. Cette après midi vers 16 heures par contre je crois pouvoir  dire que nous sommes en "beesness" (film).

16 Avril 2005
C'était le jour J! Nous sommes d'abord allés chez Jones Bee Company pour prendre les deux paquets d'abeilles. Hugo les inspecte dans le garage après que nous les ayons vaporisées avec de l'eau et du sirop. Les ruches étaient prêtes dans le jardin. Sur les conseils de quelqu'un rencontré a Jones Bee Company, j'y avais rajouté une hausse pour faciliter l'introduction des abeilles. Vers 17h il était temps d'installer les abeilles dans leurs nouvelles maisons. Première étape: enlever la boite de sirop et reine dans sa cage. La voici! Après nous être procuré des shamallows (nous avions oublié d'en acheter et il a fallu que Nora aille en vitesse au super-marcher) pour remplacer le bouchon de sa cage, je l'ai suspendue entre deux cadres de la première hausse. L'étape suivante consistait à  déverser le reste des abeilles (film) sur elle et à replacer les cadres (1,2,3) dans la hausse supérieure. Pour la première ruche, je n'avais pas suffisamment secoué la boite dans la ruche et de nombreuses abeilles étaient restées à l'intérieur. Je les ai déversées sur une planche (1) à l'entrée de la ruche et elle sont gentiment rentrées chez elles à pied. Juste après le coucher du soleil il ne restait plus que quelques abeilles égarées dehors.

15 Avril 2005
Bon, nous avons finalement quitté l'Iowa et nous sommes maintenant installés a Salt-Lake-City dans l'Utah. Nous avons un assez grand jardin et je vais y installer deux ruches. En fait je viens d'installer les ruches et les abeilles arrivent demain. J'ai commandé deux boites de deux livres et demie d'abeilles avec une reine chacune chez Jones Bee Company. J'irai les chercher demain matin et je les installerai demain soir. Nous avons invité des copains et cela devrait être une bonne soirée.

15 May 2004

Il a fait assez froid cette semaine, il a presque gelé la nuit. C'est vraiment impressionant de sentir la chaleur humide à l'entrée de la ruche. De la condensation se formait sur la planche de fonds. Maintenant la température augmente et les abeille redeviennent plus actives. Hugo aime aller les voir.

11 Mai 2004
Bon! Il s'est passé beaucoup de choses. Tout d'abord, il semble que j'ai trouvé un boulot au Département de Physique de l'Université du Utah à Salt-Lake-City. J'ai déjà trouvé une compagnie de fournitures pour l'apiculture:Jones Bee Company. L'Utah n'est il pas surnommé "l'état des abeilles"? Mais je crois que c'est pour d'autres raisons. De toutes façons, nous n'y sommes pas encore mais cela n'avait pas beaucoup de sens de démarrer une ruche alors qu'il est vraisemblable que nous déménagions début Août. J'espère que je pourrais faire ça l'année prochaine. Cela n'a heureusement pas ralenti Beth qui a eu sa ruche pleine d'abeilles Samedi 8 Mai. Je n'étais pas là mais Beth m'a tout raconté. John Johnson -notre fournisseur en abeilles- a tout d'abord agrafé la planche de fond à la hausse afin de faciliter le transport de la ruche depuis son champ jusqu'au jardin de Beth. Il a ensuite échangé sa ruche avec celle de Beth qui était vide. Il a enfin transféré les rayons un par un. Beth a remarqué que les abeilles revenaient aussi tôt à l'emplacement dont elles étaient parties et donc à la nouvelle ruche. Ils ont ensuite examiné les rayons établissant que la reine était bien là, remplissant ses fonctions de reine (pondre). Il s'agit d'un "nucleus" de Buckfast (développées à l'abbaye de Buckfast par Frère Adam) sur 7 rayons de cire contenant des oeufs, des larves, des larves en cellule fermée (brood sous opercule), du pollen, des réserves de miel et du nectar (pissenlit). Ces 7 rayons furent complété par 3 rayons à fondation Rite-Cell (plastique moulé recouvert de cire). Aujourd'hui, Beth voulait installer un panneau ajouré entre la planche de fond et la hausse ainsi que installer une seconde hausse. Nous sommes donc revenu du travail à midi, nous avons enfilé nos combinaisons et, en un rien de temps nous avons enlevé les agrafes, installé le panneau ajouré ainsi qu'une seconde hausse. Cette seconde hausse contient des rayons de Rite-Cell sur lesquels les abeilles vont devoir construire leurs alvéoles. Nous verrons comment cela aura progressé dans quelques jours.

1 Mai 2004
Il n'y a vraiment rien de nouveau mais la ruche est si belle dans la lumière du soleil que j'ai décidé de prendre une photo. J'ai ajouté un abreuvoir pour les abeilles. Elles devraient arriver dans une semaine!

24 Avril 2004
Tout a commence pendant l'été 2003 quand nous sommes allés au Reiman Garden à Ames Iowa. J'avais toujours été intéressé par la perspective d'avoir une ruche. Je me souviens de mon oncle qui s'occupait de sa vingtaine de ruches à la campagne dans la région de Pluvigner en Bretagne. Quand j'ai vu le livre "Beekeeping for dummies" par  Howland Blackinson, dans la boutique de souvenirs j'ai su que j'allais faire tout mon possible pour avoir des abeilles.
Après quelques heures passées sur le web je me suis abonné à Bee Culture (~$20 pour une année d'information mensuelle sur l'apiculture). J'ai aussi regardé les prix de l'équipement nécessaire pour commencer. Nous avons décidé de prendre le kit de luxe de Mann Lake Ltd. ($300). En même temps j'ai aussi acheté "ABC-XYZ of bee culture" qui me semble être une référence très complète. Pour la ruche j'ai aussi acheté un écran ajouré pour optimiser l'aération, une mangeoire de haut de ruche et un voile supplémentaire chez Brushy Mountain Bee Farm ($45 en tout). A tout cela il faut ajouter de la peinture blanche et de l'apprêt (~$15) ainsi que 4 parpaings qui servent de base à la ruche. Me voila donc avec ma ruche dans le jardin, dans l'impatience d'accueillir mes abeilles de chez John Johnson, un apiculteur local.

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