PHYS 7110/20: Classical Electrodynamics

Instructors:

Eugene Mishchenko, JFB 313, Email: mishch 'at' physics.utah.edu

Oleg Starykh, JFB 304, starykh 'at' physics.utah.edu

Teaching assistant (grading): Hassan Allami, email: hassan.allami 'at' utah.edu

Class meets: Lectures, WBB 517, 10:45-11:35 am, Monday & Wednesday; Discussions, WEB L126, 10:45-12:05 am, Tuesday & Thursday

Office hours: Thursday, 3-4 pm, or by appointment

Textbooks: no required text; the following books might be helpful: Landau and Lifshitz, The Theory of Fields; Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics; Brau, Modern Problems in Classical Electrodynamics.

Grading: 10 highest-score homeworks (out of 12 or 13), 15 points each (33.3%); 2 midterms, 75 points each (33.3%); final test 150 points (33.3%); no make-up test/assignments unless for legitimate reasons: emergency (documented), university-approved travel, etc.

Course description: This graduate Electrodynamics I (Fall) and II (Spring) sequence is unusual in that it is taught by a collaboration of two instructors. In addition, in departure from the traditional routine of two long lectures per week, there will normally be 2 shorter lectures (Mon, Wed) and 2 seminar-style discussions (Tue, Thu). The emphasis of the discussions is on active problem-solving under the direction of one of the instructors. Professor Mishchenko will be lecturing and Professor Starykh will be supervising discussions in the fall with the roles of the instructors reversed in the spring. 

Homeworks are due on Wednesdays at 10:45 am (before the start of the class), note there will be no homeworks in the weeks immediately after a midterm.

Separate grades will be given for both parts of this course sequence (I and II); taking the final tests is mandatory for passing each part. Final test for Electrodynamics I will be held on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2013 10:30 am - 12:30 pm.

Course Objectives: This is a core first-year graduate class whose main objectives are

1.     to lay down the foundations of the understanding of the field theory, including development of important math skills in applications of tensor algebra, partial differential equations, vector calculus, etc., essential for physicists of all later specializations;

2.     to acquire working knowledge of the broad spectrum of electromagnetic phenomena, including practical ability to analyze them qualitatively as well as quantitatively; the problems to be addressed during this course will range from classical ones in electrostatics to modern applications, such as plasmonics.

Tentative outline (Electrodynamics I):

Weeks 1-3: Relativistic kinematics, tensor algebra

Weeks 4-5: Relativistic dynamics

Weeks 6-7: Charged particle in electromagnetic field

Weeks 8-9: Action of electromagnetic field, Maxwell equations

Weeks 10-13: Time-independent electromagnetic fields

Weeks 14-15: Electromagnetic waves

Class

Date

Subject

Suggested
Reading

Homeworks
(date posted)

Due date/
Solutions

1

Mon
Aug 24

The principle of relativity, interval

1.1 - 1.4

 

 

 

Tue
Aug 25

Applications of the concept of interval

  

  

2

Wed
Aug 26

Minkowski space, Lorentz transformations

1.5 - 1.6; 1.8

#1 

 

 

Thu
Aug 27

Lorentz transformations

 

 

 3

Mon
Aug 31

4-vectors

2.1-2.4

Tue
Sep 1

4

Wed
Sep 2

4-velocity, relativistic accelerated motion

2.5 - 2.7; 1.7

#2

#1

 

Thu
Sep 3

 

 

 

 

Tue
Sep 8

 

 

 

5

Wed
Sep 9

Momentum, energy in relativistic mechanics; Lagrangian

3.1 - 3.2; 3.4

#3

#2

 

Thu
Sep 10

 

 

 

 

6

Mon
Sep 14

Non-relativistic Lagrangian mechanics

3.5

 

 

 

Tue
Sep 15

 

 

 

 

7

Wed
Sep 16

Relativistic Lagrangian mechanics

3.6

#4

#3

 

Thu
Sep 17

 

 

 

 

8

Mon
Sep 21

Collisions in relativistic mechanics

3.7

 

 

 

Tue
Sep 22

 

 

 

 

9

Wed
Sep 23

Rutherford scattering

 

#5

 

Thu
Sep 24

 

 

 

#4

10

Mon
Sep 28

Charged particle in vector potential

4.1-4.2

 

 

 

Tue
Sep 29

 

 

 

 

11

Wed
Sep 30

Charged particle in vector potential: 4-tensor formalism

4.2

 

Thu
Oct 1

 

 

 

#5

Mon
Oct 5

Midterm 1

Problems

Solutions

 

Tue
Oct 6

 

 

 

 

12

Wed
Oct 7

Tensor of electromagnetic field; Lorentz transformations of electromagnetic filed

4.3

#6

 

Thu
Oct 8

 

 

 

 

13

Mon
Oct 19

Motion of relativistic particle in electric and magnetic fields

 

 

 

Tue
Oct 20

 

 

 

 

14

Wed
Oct 21

Faraday's law, motion of charged particles in Betatron

4.4

#7

Notes

#6

 

Thu
Oct 21

 

 

 

 

15

Mon
Oct 26

Action for EM field, Maxwell equations

4.5-4.7

 

 

 

Tue
Oct 27

 

 

 

 

16

Wed
Oct 28

Energy-momentum tensor: particles

 

#8

 

#7

 

 

Thu
Oct 29

 

 

 

17

Mon
Nov 2

Energy-momentum tensor: fields

 

 

 

Tue
Nov 3

 

 

 

 

18

Wed
Nov 4

Applications of stress tensor to the calculation of forces

 

 

 

Thu
Nov 5

 

#9

#8

19

Mon
Nov 9

Electrostatics, Laplace equation, separation of variables

 

 

 

Tue
Nov 10

 

 

 

20

Wed
Nov 11

Electrostatics: multipole expansion

 

 

 

Thu
Nov 12

 

 #10

#9

21

Mon
Nov 16

Magnetostatics: vector potential, separation of variables

 

 

 

Tue
Nov 17

 

 

 

22

Wed
Nov 18

Magnetostatics: energy, work, magnetic scalar potential

 

 

 

Thu
Nov 19

Midterm 2

Problems

Solutions

23

Mon
Nov 23

Field of a long solenoid, magnetic monopoles

 

 

 

Tue
Nov 24

 

 

24

Wed
Nov 25

Magnetic moments

#11

#10

25

Mon
Nov 30

Electromagnetic waves in vacuum

 

 

 

 Tue
Dec 1

 

 

 

26

Wed
Dec 2

Electromagnetic waves in metals

4.5-4.7

#11

 

Thu
Dec 3

 

#12

 

 27

Mon
Dec 7

Fraunhofer diffraction: method of Fourier transforms

 

 

 

Tue
Dec 8

 

 

 

28

Wed
Dec 9

Fresnel diffraction: Green's functions and Huygens principle

 

 

 

Thu
Dec 10

 

 

 

#12

 

Tue
Dec 15

Final test

10:30 am - 12:30 pm in JFB B-1

 

Problems

Solutions

 

 

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